asian in a workplace

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Multicultural Group Paper Draft Human Behavior and Diversity
Instructor: Dr. Angeline O'Malley
Table of Contents

ABSTRACT4
INTRODUCTION5
THEORIES OF IDENITY FORMATION, ISSUES, AND CHALLENGES 5-6 REVIEW OF RESEARCH 6-7 Literature Review

INFLUENCE OF CULTURE (HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY 7-8-9 ANTECEDENTS OF SOCIETAL DISCRIMINATION OF ASIAN) Who are Asian Americans

Social characteristics of Asian Americans
When Did Asians Begin To Face Discrimination in the Workplace Labor History of Asian Americans
Current Asians Americans Population trends
POTENTIAL PROBLEMS THAT RESULT FROM DISCRIMINATION 9-10 AND OPPRESSION
Asian Americans in a Workplace
Asian Women Small Businesses
Barriers to Women’s Small business Success
POTENTIONAL SOLUTIONS 10- 11 Asian Worker Report the Most discrimination
Asian workers Discrimination
Fighting Back

IDENTIFICATION OF THIS AUTHOR’S PERSONAL COMPETENCIES 11-12 IN INTERACTING WITH THE ASIAN AMERICAN POPULATION
HOW THIS COURSE AND THIS PROJECT HAVE INCREASES THIS 12- 13 AUTHOR’S AWARENESS OF THE ASIAN AMERICAN POPULATION,
WHICH INCLUDES THISAUTHORS’S INITIAL CHALLENGES AND ANY
ADDITIONAL PERCIEVED CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITES
REFERENCES14- 15

Abstract
This paper provides a foundation and overview of how and why Asian Americans females are discriminated against in the workforce. When many people think of women in Asian culture, they think of a male dominated society where women do not have as many civil rights as their male counterparts. It is customary for the Korean society, that the women's role was very restricted to the home. Women, in general, could not participate in the labor force as men did, and their role was limited to domestic matters and being a wife. In terms of uniqueness of the female labor force, in 1975, allowed only 2 percent of the female labor force worked in qualified or managerial occupations, while only 4 percent worked in clerical positions (Lynch, Frederick, 2005). As of today, Asian women still face the largest discrimination in terms of employment opportunities and salary. Asian American women are often picked on and discriminated against due to the fact that their character are that they are very quiet, shy, soft spoken, and keep to themselves. Even though Asian Americans face the upmost level of workforce discrimination, none of them are liable to actually file a discrimination grievance against their employer. On the other hand, while some of these stereotypes have constructive characteristics about them, they still have become the structure of barriers establishing glass or bamboo ceilings which stop Asian American women from getting the same level of employment and respect as their male counterparts.

Introduction
This introduction on Employment and Occupational Discrimination describes how regardless of the fact that several Asian Americans work in high-status, well-paying occupations, many still experience glass ceiling barriers (sometimes referred to as the ‘bamboo ceiling’ for Asian Americans) and other mechanisms of discrimination in the workplace (Coleman, Isobel 2010). An Asian worker cited the most unfairness, but also tend to file fewer discrimination complaints than other cultural groups. One matter behind this could be that Asian Americans are likely to reside in areas where they are the only minority in many trade setting. A December 2005 Gallup census found that 31 percent of Asian respondents said they had...
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