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Better ending for Quirino Grandstand Hostage Crisis Posted by Marlone Viardo

If its reality TV you want, it can’t get any real than this.

We all know what went down in Quirino Grandstand, Manila, Philippines on the night of 23 August 2010 so I’ll spare you some of the details and fast forward to my observations.

So many things went wrong in this hostage crisis. So, so, so many.

This incident didn’t deserve such bloody ending. There were so many ways it could’ve ended with less than 9 casualties (8 hostages plus Police Sr. Insp. Mendoza, and that’s excluding people who got hit by stray bullets) but unfortunately, things turned for the worse. I’m no expert on crisis management and law enforcement, and I’ve no experience on the battlefield, but from an average Juan dela Cruz’s standpoint, there was a better way to resolve this.

For one, at around 11 a.m. to 12 p.m., packed meals were delivered to the bus. During that time, the negotiators had a clear shot at Mendoza because he was the one receiving the food. At such a close range, I believe Mendoza is at a disadvantage. With one hand reaching for the grub, Mendoza would have very small chance to defend himself from two negotiators, had they been armed.

Call me violent, but at this point, the whole world would share my sentiment when I say one dead/heavily injured person is better than nine. Of course I understand that the cops don’t want to be overly aggressive in dealing with their ex-comrade since they weren’t sure if Mendoza was alone or had an accomplice within the hell bound bus. But, if they had shot Mendoza earlier things wouldn’t have gotten out of hand. Aside from the food delivery moment, radio broadcaster Erwin Tulfo noted that there are other instances when Mendoza was clearly visible and could’ve been taken out by snipers. That, however, did not happen.

I still find it hard to comprehend why the...
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