Asa Marketing

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With the use of examples review current advertisements banned by the ASA. Critically analyse the rules imposed by the ASA, are they reflective of public demand.

ASA are the UK’s independent regulator of advertising in all media. They ensure that the ads being produced are legal, decent, honest and truthful by using the advertising codes and by seeing if the ads meet their regulations.

Referring to the L’Oreal foundation make up advertisements, ASA decided that it was socially responsible for them to ban the two ads as it was claimed to be misleading and dishonest. Many argued that L’Oreal used the tool of airbrushing in their images of Christy Turlington and Julia Roberts to enhance the perfection of their foundation cosmetic. However, L’Oreal did own up to the claim and admitted that within their Maybelline and Lancôme ad they did utilise the use of ‘post production techniques’, but they justified themselves by adding that the reason for using the tool of airbrushing was to ‘accurately illustrate the results’ This can have a huge impact on public demand, consumers are technically buying a product that doesn’t work the way it portrays in its ads, if the foundation products worked the way Maybelline and Lancôme claimed it did, there would be no need for L’Oreal to edit the images. But does this mean that there will be a fall in demand? Referring to figure 1, we see that in 2006 L’Oreal was ranked 359th, as the year goes on in 2007 the ranking rises as well as L’Oreal’s revenues and profit. However in 2008 which was after the ads were banned, L’Oreal’s ranking fell to 355 but nonetheless its revenues and profits were still increasing. Thus, even though L’Oreal’s reputation and ranking was effected, their revenue and profits were still favourable.

Figure 1-CNN’s Annual Ranking
|Year |Ranking |Revenues($ millions) |Profits($ millions) | |2008 |355...
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