As U Like It Shakespeare

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you like it------------------------shakespeare comedy------------------------- Act 3, Scene 4
| Original Text| Modern Text|
| Enter ROSALIND and CELIA| ROSALIND and CELIA enter.| | ROSALINDNever talk to me. I will weep.| ROSALINDDon’t talk to me. I’m going to cry.| | CELIADo, I prithee, but yet have the grace to consider that tears do not become a man.| CELIAGo ahead if you want, but remember that crying doesn’t suit a man.| | ROSALINDBut have I not cause to weep?| ROSALINDBut don’t I have good reason to cry?|

5| CELIAAs good cause as one would desire. Therefore weep.| CELIAAs good a reason as any. So go ahead and cry.| | ROSALINDHis very hair is of the dissembling color.| ROSALINDI mean, his hair is even red—the same color as that lying Judas.| | CELIASomething browner than Judas’s. Marry, his kisses areJudas’s own children.| CELIANo, it’s a shade browner than Judas’s—but his kisses are just like Judas’s.| | ROSALINDI' faith, his hair is of a good color.| ROSALINDNo, really, his hair is a nice color.|

10| CELIAAn excellent color. Your chestnut was ever the only color.| CELIAA very good color, this chestnut.| | ROSALINDAnd his kissing is as full of sanctity as the touch of holy bread.| ROSALINDHis kiss is as holy as bread blessed by a priest.| | CELIAHe hath bought a pair of cast lips of Diana. A nun of winter’s sisterhood kisses not more religiously. The very ice of chastity is in them.| CELIAHe must have bought a cast-iron pair of Diana’slips: an elderly nun isn’t anymore devoted in her kissing than he is. His kiss is cold and chaste.| | ROSALINDBut why did he swear he would come this morning, and comes not?| ROSALINDBut why would he promise to come visit me this morning and then not come?| -------------------------------------------------

Act 3, Scene 4, Page 2
| Original Text| Modern Text|
| CELIANay, certainly, there is no truth in him.| CELIAReally, he’s a total liar.| | ROSALINDDo you think so?| ROSALINDDo you think so?|

20| CELIAYes, I think he is not a pick-purse nor a horse-stealer, but for his verity in love, I do think him as concave as a covered goblet or a worm-eaten nut.| CELIAYes. He’s not a pickpocket or a horse thief, but when it comes to truth in love, he’s as hollow as a cup or a nut hollowed out by a worm.| | ROSALINDNot true in love?| ROSALINDYou think his feelings aren’t true?| | CELIAYes, when he is in, but I think he is not in.| CELIAOh, I think they are—when he’s in love. But he’s not in love.|

25| ROSALINDYou have heard him swear downright he was.| ROSALINDBut you heard him swear up and down that he was.| | CELIA“Was” is not “is.” Besides, the oath of a lover is no stronger than the word of a tapster. They are both the confirmer of false reckonings. He attends here in the forest on the duke your father.| CELIAHe “was,” but that doesn’t mean he is anymore. Besides, the promises of a lover are as untrustworthy as a bartender handing you an inflated tab: they both swear to their lies. He’s staying in the forest with your father now.|

30| ROSALINDI met the duke yesterday and had much question with him. He asked me of what parentage I was. I told him, of as good as he. So he laughed and let me go. But what talk we of fathers when there is such a man as Orlando?| ROSALINDI met my father in the woods yesterday and had a long conversation with him. He asked me who my parents were, and I told him they were as good as he was. He laughed at that and let me go. But why are we talking about my father, when a man like Orlando exists?| | CELIAOh, that’s a brave man. He writes brave verses, speaks brave words, swears brave oaths, and breaks them bravely, quite traverse, athwart the heart of his lover, as a puny tilter that spurs his horse but on one side breaks his staff like a noble goose; but all’s brave that youth mounts and folly guides.| CELIAOh, sure, he’s a brave man! He writes brave poems, speaks...
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