As You Like It Act 1 Scene 3: Contextual Question

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As you like it Act 1 Scene 3

Solved Contextual Question
Rosalind: The duke my father loved his father dearly.
Celia: Doth it therefore ensue that you should love his son dearly? By this kind of chase, I should hate him, for my father hated his father dearly; yet I hate not Orlando.
Rosalind: N, faith, hate him not, for my sake.
Celia: Why should I not? Doth he not deserve well?
i) What inconvenience has Orlando suffered on account of being the son of Sir
Rowland?
Orlando has to suffer the malice of his elder brother Oliver since his father’s death and secondly, this fact has made Duke Frederick feel antagonistic to the young man as he is the son of his enemy. ii) What argument does Celia give to the reasoning given by Rosalind for having fallen in love with Orlando?

Celia asserts that if Rosalind’s reasoning that she loves Orlando because her father the Duke senior loved his father were true, she (Celia) should likewise hate Orlando since her father hated Sir Rowland de Boys. (the deceased father of Orlando)

iii) How can you conclude from the extract that Rosalind is in deep love with Orlando?
Rosalind’s reasoning that she had to fall in love with Orlando anyway because her father loved his (Orlando’s) father clearly shows her deep love for Orlando.
iv) What were Celia and Rosalind discussing about love just before the extract?
On Celia’s asking Rosalind if Cupid (the god of love) had mercy upon her and as to why she was keeping silent, Rosalind answered that she had not a single word to hurl even at a dog. Protesting, Celia says that her cousin’s words were too valuable to be wasted like that. Having engaged in such word-play for a while, Celia urged Rosalind to fight against the feeling of love which had taken possession of her. When Rosalind expressed her inability to do so, Celia wanted to know if it was really possible for her to develop such a strong liking for Orlando so abruptly.

v) Who interrupts the conversation of Rosalind and Celia? In what mood is that person? Why has that person come there?
The Duke Frederick does so.
He is in an angry mood since his discovery of Rosalind’s preferences for Orlando, the son of his enemy Sir Rowland de Boys.
He has come with the intention of announcing Rosalind’s banishment from his court.

Extract II
Duke Frederick: Thus do all traitors:
If their purgation did consist in words,
They are as innocent as grace itself:
Let it suffice thee that I trust thee not.
Rosalind: Yet your mistrust can not make me a traitor:
Tell me whereon the likelihood depends.
Duke Frederick: Thou art thy father’s daughter; there’s enough. i) What did Duke Frederick accuse Rosalind of? What arguments did she give to defend herself?
Duke Frederick accused Rosalind of a feigned (artificial) innocence like that of the traitors who try to prove their blamelessness with mere words instead of concrete proof. Simply put, he bluntly accused Rosalind of being a traitor.

Rosalind asserted that her uncle’s not trusting her could not make her a betrayer. She then wanted to know on what ground he could level such a grave allegation at her. When Frederick said he did not trust her because she was the daughter of her father, Rosalind quipped back saying that it was strange that he could rely on her when he took the dukedom and banished her father. She further said confidently that sedition (treachery) is not inherited or, if treason automatically passes from a father to his daughter, it did not affect her because her father was not a traitor. Then she firmly defied being called a traitor because she was wretched and poor.

ii) How did the Duke react to her defence? State why the Duke does not trust Rosalind?
The Duke only said that her being her father’s daughter was enough reason to banish her from his court.
Frederick has the same reason for mistrusting and hating Rosalind as...
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