Artistic Aroogance

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Literature Essay
Hogan Victor Antia
Grade: 11
Othello’s downfall is to a large extent to be blamed on the supernatural manipulative behaviour of Iago. However, Iago needed an “ally” if he was going to destroy Othello and this came in the form of Othello's own inner demons which are pride and jealousy. Othello’s pride and jealousy were just the little remaining factors that wrapped up his downfall besides the major impact of Iago. Othello foolishly places far too much trust in "honest Iago", which Iago then uses against him. Iago shows the audience his intentions when he states that he has no loyalty in Othello “I follow him to serve my turn upon him”. This shows that Iago has been plotting Othello’s downfall for quite some time and Iago has valuable reasons as to why he is comfortable with the position of Othello’s "ensign". Iago knows in his heart that the outcome of this situation will be more rewarding once he successfully completes his plot of disastrous but beneficial events. Iago’s first soliloquoy detailed his hatred for the Moor "I hate the Moor." This quote plainly reinforces to the audience that he is very angry with Othello and actually loathes him. This is not the first time he has expressed his hatred for Othello, but it is the first time he has done so and have nothing to gain by saying it, for example when he says it just to gain the trust of others when in actuality he hates Othello for the better life he has been handed. Iago also talks about the fact that it is generally believed that the moor has slept with his wife, in reality this is untrue and just a rumour. "Not know if it be true but will act as if it was for surety". This also gives Iago yet another motive for his ill-famed deeds. This foreshadows Othello’s downfall to come. Iago’s manipulations reduced the once Powerful Othello to a man weakened by his wife’s alleged betrayal. Iago’s control over Othello’s power is shown when Othello says “Thou hast set me on a rack. I swear ‘tis...
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