Art of Cooking

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Art of cooking

I have a passion for culinary art. My double culture, and family background was behind this love .I always thought that being half French , half Moroccan is a great mixture , but starting to cook approved it to me .

I remember when I used to sneak in my mom’s kitchen, and play with the ingredients. It was a great time where I learned how to mix, and make new dishes by improvising new combinations. For example, I mixed flavors and textures that were usually never combined. Or even add new colors in my dishes that raise their beauty. 

I was not the only one fascinated by food. My dad a professional chef got me into the world of pastry, and Moroccan traditional food ex: “Tagine,” which is primarily used to slow-cook savory stews and vegetable dishes. Because the domed or cone-shaped lid of the tagine traps steam and returns the condensed liquid to the pot.

 

 Morocco is the culinary star of North Africa; it is the doorway between Europe and Africa. Much imperial and trade influence has been filtered, and blended into this culture. Moroccan cooking is characterized by rich spices that combine anywhere from 10 to 100 spices.

French and Moroccan cooking cuisines have been subject to Berber, Moorish, Arab, and European influences. Most French dishes are known for their complex, and rich flavors, we love bread, and wines.

Most of people tried some French recipes, or food without knowing that is even French. You may find them all over the world. Ex:

* Crêpes:  a very flat pancake typically stuffed with fruit or cream. * Baguette: a long French bread loaf.
* Chocolate mousse: this lighter than air dessert originated in France. * Éclair : a pastry stuffed with cream and topped with icing. * Crème Brûlée : Custard topped with hard caramel.

“One cannot think well, love well, and sleep well, if one has not dined well.”
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