argumentative synthesis on skateboarding

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Chris Archbold
Argumentative Synthesis
Prof. McKee
17 April 2013
Argumentative Synthesis on Skateboarding
Skateboarding is a sport that is uniquely different from all others. It doesn’t require a team competing for a common goal. There isn’t a legitimate system that judges how talented a skateboarder is. There is no league regulating how skateboarding should be done. Skateboarding is an individualistic sport that provides infinite potential for progression. There is no limit on the amount of tricks that can be learned or landed. With stair sets, handrails, ledges, and street obstacles everywhere, the world becomes a skateboarder’s playground. Unfortunately, there is a wide misperception about skateboarding that many people develop. This is usually due to ignorance or a lack of knowledge of its culture. Many people refer to skateboarders as people who vandalize public and private property. It is not uncommon for a skateboarder to be yelled at outrageously or be threatened to have law enforcement called on them. There are more vast amounts of basketball courts, swimming pools, football fields, or even tennis courts than there are skate parks. Skateboarders should be allowed to skate public property more freely without facing such harsh, unnecessary consequences.

Skateboarding has a long, evolving history behind it. It first evolved from surfboarding, which consisted of cruising ocean waves on a long board made out of wood. The early rise of skateboarding developed when surfboarders had a desire to surf sidewalks when ocean conditions weren’t favorable. This eventually led to the invention of the Skateboard. The board of a skateboard, the deck, was much smaller than the size of a surfboard. Skateboards made in the 1960’s were very thin, and consisted of large rubber wheels for cruising around in empty pools with steep, vertical surfaces. The technology of skateboard decks evolved into decks with diagonally slanted ends and concave borders. This allowed a skateboarder to bring a skateboard off the ground, with a scooping, sliding motion of the feet. This process, called the Ollie, is the first trick all street skateboarders must learn before they progress. This eventually led to the creation of flip tricks, variation tricks, and grinds tricks. When the Ollie became the primary stepping stone for progression, it opened the door for skateboarders to be able to skate any obstacle from stair sets, handrails, ledges, or anything architecture might offer.

Skateboarding naturally evolved into street skating, which involves utilizing any outdoor property. The slang term skateboarders use to describe a skate obstacle is a spot. If there is nothing to skate, a skateboarder can use a parking lot to progress their flat ground tricks. Even a pizza box out a dumpster can be used to do tricks over. Absolutely anything can be used by a skateboarder to perfect their craft. Skateboarding is not limited to ramps or half pipes like most people believe. A bench at a bus stop can be used for grind tricks. What people see as a rail to guide them down a set of stairs is seen as a handrail to grind on by a skateboarder. Skateboarders view everything they see outdoors as a potential skate spot, regardless if people agree with it or not. Skateboarding is past the era of skating just pools and ramps. Martial Arts have evolved to the creation of the UFC and MMA league. The sport of racing has evolved to drag racing, NASCAR, street racing, and even drifting, where drivers get paid to spin out in cars. If racing can get a pass to evolve to different counter sports, with corporations financially supporting it, why can’t skateboarding get a pass? Its 2013 and skateboarder’s deserve to have more freedom.

The consequences skateboarders face for skating in the streets has gotten out of hand. In a lot of states, skateboarders face unnecessary consequences for skating public property other than a skate park. In...
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