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Organ Sales
Wouldn’t a person do anything to stay alive? The fastest way to get an organ is to buy it. As the person waits, the lesser chance for herself/himself to get better or stay alive. The government should legalize organ sales to increase the supply of organs in order to save more lives; there will not be a shortage of organs when needed. Since there were always been shortage and conflicts on organ donation, it would be better to legalize selling and buying organs because many people would pay money for an organ and many will be willing to sell their organ to have money in exchange. Many operations have been cancelled due to lack of organ supplies. Since organ sales in America are illegal, transplant tourism has increased. Many people would oppose to legalizing organ sales because those people believes that each person, whether rich or poor, must have equal medical benefits. Many operations are not being performed because there are not enough organs to use for transplant. Transplant operations have been performed successfully but the supplies of organs haven’t increased because many people are simply unwilling to donate their bodily parts. For every 100,000-transplant operation needed each year, only 10,000 are performed (Velasquez, Andre, 2013). More than 10,000 people in the UK currently need a transplant. Of these, 1000 each year - the equivalent of three a day - will die waiting, as there are not enough organs available (Bates, 2011). Leading surgeons have called on the government to consider legalizing the sale of human organs for transplants (Bates, 2011). There are many people who can currently donate organs such as a kidney while still alive but cannot make money from them. They also can't decide whom the organs go to. Many doctors, such as Professor Nadey Hakim, think this policy should be urgently reconsidered (Bates, 2011). Professor John Harris, of Manchester University, supports a debate of the...
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