Are We Too Dependent on Mobiles?

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Are We Too Dependent On Our Mobiles?
In the media today, we all hear a great deal about the perils of modern technology. We now can be addicted to the Internet, Facebook and Twitter, not to mention the already existent perils like television, alcohol and drugs. What isn’t often mentioned is our addiction to cell phones. Maybe nobody talks about it because, unlike Twitter and Facebook, cell phones are such useful tools for everything from friendship to business. Cell phones have not only become a method for communication, they have evolved into an entertainment gadget. Because these small, hand-held computers seem to do it all, young kids beg and plead for a cell phone. The average age for teens to receive their own cell phone is between 12 and 13. But that doesn’t mean you won’t see even younger children with phones. About 3 percent of children receive their cell phone under age 10, and 6 percent get them at age 10. Cell phones are a way that teenagers feel they can communicate with other individuals. According to one study, 84 percent of teens say they like that cell phones make it easy to talk to people. Additionally, the study states that 69 percent of teens say their cell phone is used as a form of entertainment and 47 percent say their social life would end without their cell phone. The same study shows that 57 percent say their life has improved by using their cell phone. Every single person is very attached to his or her phone. Can you imagine going out at night without it? Can you even imagine going through the day without it? Most of us never turn our phones off anymore, because it could cut us off from contact. We just leave it on at night while charging, always ready for that incoming text. What exemplifies this addiction is the fact that when we don’t have our phones, we become distraught. That period in which your phone is out of battery or broken is absolutely unnerving. A survey in the New York Times last year claimed that 61% of people use their...
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