Are Entrepreneurs Born or Made?

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Entrepreneurs are born not made.

“You were born to win, but to be a winner, you must plan to win, prepare to win, and expect to win.”  (Zig ziglar, Author and speaker).

One may be born with the mental capacity to innovate, think big and achieve great success, but success requires more than merely great ideas. Successful Entrepreneurs are people who are able to think critically, manage problem solving, attain people skills and most importantly possess the passion to manifest their dreams into reality.

Nature vs. Nurture

The debate of Nature versus Nurture has been one of the oldest topics address in Psychology. Overall, it is focuses on the relative influence of genetics and the environment on human development. Over time, two separate schools of thought have emerged. Philosophers such as Plato, believe most things are inborn or they occur naturally irrespective of environmental factors. Others like John Locke believe in an idea termed ‘Tabula Rasa’, which states that the mind begins as a blank state. Rendering by this thought, everything we become and all of our knowledge, is determined by our experiences.

However, recent ideas present a wider range of logical reasoning to support related claims. It is definite that certain individuals were born with the innate tendencies to take risks, identify opportunities, speak persuasively symbolic of inherent marketing skills, accept challenges and the ability to overcome failure; these ideas introduce an article titled “Are Entrepreneurs born or made?” in a Bloomberg business week. Also noted was the author of the book ‘Born Entrepreneurs, Born Leaders’, Scott Shane who persistently presents the idea, “that the tendency toward entrepreneurship is about 48 percent ‘heritable’.

Though certain entrepreneurial attributes are believed to be attained at birth, other key factors such as passion, positive action, commitment, focus, optimism and entrepreneurial consultant John J. Rooney, managing director of IBG, "In my experience…it is clear that much of entrepreneurship can be successfully learned. However, it is also clear that people who take positive action and are focused and committed and continue on despite some negative feedback or setbacks have skill sets and personality traits that can be inborn or learned." Pursuing a passion is a push from within deems Dean Lindal, Vice president of Entrepreneurs Organization, “anyone anywhere has the opportunity to build a business as long as they have a passion, an attitude of never giving up, and valuable mentors that can complement their skill sets,".

Other factors aid in entrepreneurial success

 John Delmatoff, an executive coach, believes that most entrepreneurs fail due to depending overly on innate skills and an unsubstantial amount on learned skills. It is common for one to try to focus limited resources on several ideas simultaneously, which often results in providing inadequate attention to all finally leading to failure. Hence, persistence, patience and passion to tackle all challenges and focus on the goal are ways of thinking that requires training, development and practice over years of experience. John J Rooney supports this thought by disclosing that a survey conducted by him demonstrated “that 87 percent of entrepreneurs start companies in niches where they already have business experience. People who get formal training are much more likely to succeed than those who fly by the seat of their pants.”

David Weiman, a management psychologist in suburban Philadelphia and a psychology professor at Strayer University believes that optimism and persistence are considered crucial traits in successful entrepreneurs, and can be intentionally practiced through following step-by-step methods to advance ones skill to tackle obstacles and succeed. Wieman supports the book Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman as he thinks it "seems to suggest that emotional competencies—such as self-awareness or the...
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