Are atheists happier than believers?

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Extended essay
Phil Zukerman, Am American professor of sociology, suggests that countries where the population is mostly atheists are happier than countries with a high percentage of believers. Using relevant examples, demonstrate whether this theory is true or not.

Atheism is the absence of believing in God and his existence. There is variety of reasons why people decide not to believe in God, for some of them, they were scientifically convinced and for others they were raised and taught in a society that has no religion, and therefore they followed the same footsteps by which their ancestors were brought up. Phil Zukerman, an American sociology professor claims that; ‘countries where the population is mostly atheist are more happy than countries with a high percentage of believers’ (Zukerman, 2008), his theory was based on his research that he made, he was asked by Cambridge University press to write a chapter in the book ‘Society without a God’ to establish how many atheists there are in the world by country, He spent six months looking through national and international surveys and as a result he made a list of countries that was sorted by the number of atheists according to the population, Denmark and Sweden were found to be the countries with the highest percentage of atheists.(Zukerman,2005), Zukerman assumes that there is a direct relation between religion and happiness and he defines happiness by being wealthy, secure, healthy and strong however data on other religious and prosperous countries undermines his assumptions.

Phil Zukerman outlined that countries with higher percentage of atheist people, especially Denmark, are not interested in religion and they are quiet secular, some particular views were taken into consideration, mostly from Danes and Swedes, that religious people seem to think a world without God is hell on earth. However Scandinavians, that does not seem to be the case especially in Denmark and Sweden....
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