Architects of the Ottomans

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  • Topic: Istanbul, Ottoman Empire, Suleiman the Magnificent
  • Pages : 2 (312 words )
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  • Published : March 24, 2013
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Architects Of the Ottomans

Building design and architecture, in the Ottoman Empire was inspired by many different cultures, especially those of Persia and Byzantium. Important features of Ottoman architecture included domed roofs, large inner spaces, columns, and emphasis on height and the use of light and shadow. Mosques were the most important buildings in the Ottoman empire. All mosques were built in a grand monumental style to emphasis their significance to the society.

Primary Source
Possibly Mimar Sinan (left) at the tomb of Suleiman the Magnificent, 1566

Primary Source
Possibly Mimar Sinan (left) at the tomb of Suleiman the Magnificent, 1566

Visual
This painting is of Mimar Sinan. He was the great Ottoman architect renowned for the building of the Selimiye Mosque in Edirne.

Visual
This painting is of Mimar Sinan. He was the great Ottoman architect renowned for the building of the Selimiye Mosque in Edirne.

Raimondo D'Aronco and Alexander Vallaury were the leading architects of this period in Istanbul. Apart from Vallaury and D'Aronco, the other leading architects who made important contributions to the late Ottoman architecture in Istanbul included the architects of the Balyan family, William James Smith, August Jachmund, Mimar Kemaleddin Bey, Vedat Tek and Giulio Mongeri. Architects were considered the intellectuals of their era. Instead of universities, the Ottomans created professional colleges to turn out engineers and architects, (military) doctors and veterinaries, accountants and administrators. The integration of minorities into the Ottoman Empire such as Jews and Christians into every level of society, for example; military, government, business and so on allowed a sense of unity to a certain extent and allowed the most qualified individuals to contribute their part for the Empire. Architects were classified business and therefore were regarded as of higher class. Muslims were referred to as ‘people of the book’ and slaves...
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