Araby: Short Story and Brown Imperturbable Faces

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  • Topic: Dubliners, Dublin, James Joyce
  • Pages : 14 (4971 words )
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  • Published : January 13, 2011
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CONTENTS

Page

Thesis Statement and Outline 02

I. The Domination of Darkness 03
Đỗ Kim Ngân 03-05

Trần Thị Thu Hiền 05-06

II. The Indifference Attitude 07
Lâm Thị Phương Nga 07-08

Đào Ngọc Ánh 08-10

III. The Bare Surroundings Together With the Empty and Slow Train 11 Đỗ Thị Hằng 11-13

IV. The Unilateral Love 14
Trần Đức Minh 14-15

Nguyễn Kiều Trang 15-16

Appendix: Araby by James Joyce

Thesis statement: The short story Araby by James Joyce (1882-1941) depicts a picture which extends to us a profound impression about a gloomy, lukewarm stagnant and sultry life of Dubliners in 1890s.

OUTLINE

I. The domination of darkness throughout the story seemed to portray a gloomy life of Dubliners at that time and to foreshadow an unhappy ending.

II. The indifference attitude among the characters in the story showed a lukewarm life.

III. The bare surroundings together with the empty and slow train show us a boring and dull life without any motivation.

IV. The boy kept cherishing a unilateral love to a girl and dare not to bare his heart. To some extent, it can be seen that the people at that time seemed to be pushed down by an invisible complex which was too sultry to pursue their desires and express their feelings.

Araby is considered as one of the best short stories by James Joyce, a famous Irish novelist and poem. Araby (1905), told from the perspective of a young boy, belongs to Dubliners (1914) – the first set of James Joyce. Joyce is a very influential writer in the avant-garde of the early 20th century. And like many famous writers in 20th century, he did not have a smooth life. James Joyce wrote Araby in Trieste, Austria where he lived for quite a long time feeling there was no position for him, and frustrated with his frivolity of money, drinking habits and strained relationship with his brother. The collection Dubliners was a portrait of life in Dublin, Ireland, at the turn of the twentieth century. The title “Araby” is taken from the real festival which came to Dublin in 1894 when the author was only 12 years old. Like the rest of Dubliners, the short story "Araby" depicts a picture which extends to us a profound impression about a gloomy, lukewarm, stagnant and sultry life of Dubliners in 1890s.

I. The domination of darkness throughout the story seemed to portray a gloomy life of Dubliners at that time and to foreshadow an unhappy ending.

ĐỖ KIM NGÂN

The gloomy picture in the story was first portrayed through the overwhelming of darkness from the beginning until the end.

The opening scenes of the story described the young boy’s overall view of the world. This is a blind world. From the first sentence, we can see his gloomy background. He lived in the street, named North Richmond in Ireland's largest city, Dublin in 1894, which was introduced as a “blind”, “quiet street”(1). The image of an “uninhabited” and “detached” house (2, 3) from the others in the street created an image of isolation for this house as well as for the boy who felt alone and detached from his neighbors. In addition, the image of the “blind end” (3) illustrated the darkness and the somberness of the city and the citizens’ life at that time and suggested that there was nowhere that the boy and his friends could go except for dreary houses and streets here (3). The next sentence seemed to foreshadow the entire story. “The other houses of the street” gazing at one another with “brown imperturbable faces” were “conscious of decent lives” (3- 5). The hopelessness and the dull life of the boy’s were clearly reflected through the houses that contained the sense of the dead present and lost past. The boy in this paragraph was as blind as his world.

In the third paragraph, the narrator described the depressing atmosphere. Darkness continued to reappear “in the short...
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