Aquinas' 2nd Argument

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The Cosmological Argument has been disputed over since the beginning of religion. Greek philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, and other theologians have provided reasons for either their belief or disbelief of the existence almighty being; God. Thomas Aquinas adapted a personal answer for the controversial argument. Aquinas provides five ways for the existence of God that he devised through his observations and logical analysis. His arguments provide reasoning for many people that cannot believe in faith alone but are rather searching for proof. Aquinas attempts to provide evidence in his second way by analyzing the notion of efficient cause. Thomas Aquinas deems the existence of God can be proved in his second way. Aquinas bases his second way on the foundation of efficient causes. The term efficient cause refers to the means or agent that brings something about. For instance, in the case of a painting, it is the painter and the movement of the brush that caused the painting to exist. Efficient causes occur constantly and can visibly be observed in nature, however an object efficiently causing itself has never been observed and is reasonably believed to be impossible. Aquinas states that in order for something to efficiently cause itself, it must have existed prior to itself, which by sure logic is nonsensical. Since nothing can possibly cause the existence of itself, Aquinas believes that there is one omniscient first creator that is the cause of all the happenings to follow. However, Aquinas’ argument does not cease there. He goes on to add that it is not possible to continue to infinity in a series of efficient causes. Aquinas explains this statement by saying that within a series of efficient causes there is the creator, or first member which causes the intermediate and eventually the final member. The intermediate members can be countless, but once a cause is removed the outcome on its following subject is no longer evident. In theory, if there...
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