Application Assignment # 2

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Situation: Your thirst and hunger centers tell you that you are dehydrated and hungry. You decide a cold water (or beer if you fancy) and chicken wings will satisfy such desires. You need to reach for your frosty beverage on the counter directly in front of you. Your starting point should be anatomical position.

Instructions:
(Part 1) Specify the movements, muscles, bones, and joints involved in reaching for the glass and bringing it to your mouth. As in the previous Application Assignment, explain any and all movements individually across each joint involved specifying the actions involved (i.e. flexion, extension, etc.), the muscles causing such actions, the bones being pulled on by said muscles, the types of joints involved, and how these movements collectively relate to the overall scenario/movements in this application. (Part 2) Trace the path of the water from the mouth to the urethra, listing the path in as much detail as possible. Be very specific and very detailed. Your answer should include both the digestive and renal systems. (Part 3) You finally go in for some chicken wings. Specify the movements, muscles, bones and joints involved in opening your mouth and chewing those scrumptious wings. Once again, explain any and all movements individually across each joint involved specifying the actions involved (i.e. flexion, extension, etc.), the muscles causing such actions, the bones being pulled on by said muscles, the types of joints involved, and how these movements collectively relate to the overall scenario/movements in this application. (Part 4) Trace the path of “the wings” from the mouth to the anus, listing the path in as much detail as possible. Again, be very specific and very detailed including the absorption/elimination of nutrients/wastes.

*Remember that all answers should be in your own words.

Answer:

Part 1:
The movement begins with the muscle pectoralis major (origin Sternum, insertion Humerus). The next muscle is the coracobrachialis (origin Coracoid process of scapula, insertion medial humerus). This triggers the biceps brachii (origin scapula, insertion radius). This completes extending the arm to the glass.

To rotate the hand (still facing forward in anatomical position) we use the muscle pronator teres (origin humeral head, insertion middle of lateral radius) and pronator quadratus (origin distal ¼ of ulna, insertion distal ¼ of radius). The brachioradialis (origin humerus, insertion radius) gives the ability to hold the hand upright.

To grab a hold of the frosty mug requires the four fingers to flex as one movement, and the thumb to flex as a separate movement. Fingers have three joints in which they can flex (the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint, the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint, and the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint while the thumb only has two joints the metacarpophalangeal joint and an interphalangeal (IP) joint. The muscle that is capable of moving all three joints of the fingers is flexor digitorum profundus (origin upper ¾ of ulna, insertion distal phalanx of medial four digits). The thumb is flexed (to grab and steady the frosty mug) by the flexor pollicis longus (origin middle anterior radius, insertion distal phalanx of thumb). To pull the frosty mug to my waiting mouth is a forearm flexion, which begins with biceps brachii (origin scapula, insertion radius). The next muscle is the brachialis (origin anterior humerus, insertion ulna), which moves the brachioradialis (origin humerus, insertion radius). This completes the forearm flexion, which ends up with the frosty mug at my mouth. However, we must finish with a wrist adduction, starting with flexor carpi ulnaris (origin humerus, insertion pisiform & hamate bones via the pisohamate ligament) which moves the extensor carpi ulnaris (origin humerus, insertion dorsal fingers and dorsal thumb). This completes reaching for the frosty mug and bringing it to my mouth.

Part 2:
Part of this...
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