Apple History and Development

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 188
  • Published : July 30, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
Founded in 1976 in a garage in Santa Clara, California, Apple is the brainchild of Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs, two college dropouts who sought to provide a user-friendly computer to a new and distinct market of small computer users. Between 1978 and 1980, sales increased from $7.8 million to $117 million, and in 1980 the company underwent its initial public stock offering. In 1983, Steve Wozinak left Apple. That same year Steve Jobs hired away John Sculley from Pepsi to be the company's president. After experiencing several product failures, Apple unveiled the Macintosh computer in 1984 to overwhelming success, setting the stage for Apple's rise and its recognition as a household name.

By 1985, relations between Sculley and Jobs became contentious. Finally, the board of directors sided with Sculley, and Steve Jobs was forced from the company he helped found. Additionally, while CEO of Apple, John Sculley ignored Microsoft founder Bill Gates's appeal for Apple to license the Macintosh operating system to Microsoft. Gates had hoped to make the Macintosh platform an industry standard. However, with Sculley refusing to license the operating system, Gates purchased and developed the DOS operating system, which has become the international operating standard for more than 90 percent of all personal computers in the world.

By the late 1980s, competition from Microsoft's Windows operating system and the abject failure of Apple's Newton handheld computer caused the earnings of Apple to plunge, forcing a reduction in the Apple workforce and the resignation of John Sculley. In 1997, Gilbert Amelio, Apple's current CEO, orchestrated the purchase of the company NextStep from Apple founder Steve Jobs. The NeXT operating system was a vast improvement over the then outdated Macintosh operating system. At the time of the purchase, it was hoped that the NeXT operating system could be used to.


Vision Statement:
Apple ignited the personal computer revolution in the 1970s with the Apple II and reinvented the personal computer in the 19805 with the Macintosh. Apple is committed to bringing the best personal computing experience to students, educators, creative professionals, and consumers around the world through its innovative hardware, software, and Internet offerings.

Mission Statement
Apple Computer is committed to protecting the environment, health and safety of our employees, customers and the global communities 'where we operate. We recognize that by integrating sound environmental, health and safety management practices into all aspects of our business, we can offer technologically innovative products and services while conserving and enhancing resources for future generations. Apple strives for continuous improvement in OUf environmental, health and safety management systems and in the environmental quality of our products, processes and services.

Apple Values are the qualities, customs, standards, and principles that the company believes will help it and its employees succeed. They are the basis for what we do and how we do it. Taken together, they identify Apple as a unique company.

Apple's computers became known for their user friendly interface. While most other computer companies focused on selling to big businesses, Apple targeted home users, which led to a string of influential computers using a graphical interface. The Apple brand has the biggest impact on the world's consumers, while Microsoft and the United States nation brand are those considered most in need of a remake.


* Pest Model:
A variety of pests invade McIntosh apples trees, including spider mites and aphids that injure new growth and sometimes the fruit. Scale insects and coddling moths also cause problems with apple production.

tracking img