Apa Style Lite for College Papers

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APA STYLE LITE FOR COLLEGE PAPERS
American Psychological Association Style for Final Manuscripts by Dr Abel Scribe PhD - January 2010 APA Lite for College Papers is a concise guide to crafting research papers in the style of the American Psychological Association (APA). It is based on the current edition of the APA Publication Manual (corrected printing, 2009) while incorporating guidelines for “Material Other Than Journal Articles” found in the last edition. APA Lite succeeds the APA Crib Sheet developed by Professor Dewey in the 1990s and revised by the Abel Scribe collaboration in the current century. Doc Scribe is not affiliated in any way with the American Psychological Association--this style guide is free! APA Style Lite for College Papers © Copyright 2010 by Dr Abel Scribe PhD.

APA LITE TOPICS
1.0. General Features. What is APA style? What’s most important to get right? 2.0. Title & Text Page. Getting started: the title and first text pages, headings and subheadings, seriation or lists. 3.0. Text Rules. Rules to observe as you write: abbreviations, capitalization, emphasis (italics), quotations. 4.0. Numbers & Statistics. Rules for presenting common numbers, precise measures, and statistics. 5.0. Tables & Figures. APA style tables require attention to detail, graphs and images less so. 6.0. Citations & References. You absolutely, positively--no exceptions!--must get this right! Appendix. Language Bias.

STUDENTS SHUNNED BY APA! - STYLE GOES UNDERGROUND
The last edition of the APA Manual advised students that “the Publication Manual is not intended to cover scientific writing at an undergraduate level” (APA, 2001, p. 322). They meant it! While the last edition devoted a chapter to “Material Other Than Journal Articles” as an aid for students (chapter 6), the current edition has eradicated all such guidance. Take this advice from the APA: “Not writing for publication? Not our problem!” Final manuscripts. The APA calls papers written for publication copy manuscripts. They are formatted to aid the publication process, not the reader. When not writing for publication “the manuscript must be as readable as possible” (APA, 2001, p. 323). The APA calls these papers final manuscripts. There are minor differences: 1. Organization. “In a manuscript submitted for publication, figures, tables, and footnotes are placed at the end of the manuscript; in theses and dissertations, such material is frequently incorporated at the appropriate point in text as a convenience to readers” (APA, 2001, p. 325). 2. Line spacing. “Double-spacing is required throughout most of the manuscript. When single-spacing would improve readability, however, it is usually encouraged. Single-spacing can be used for table titles and headings, figure captions, references (but double-spacing is required between references), footnotes, and long quotations [this is sometimes referred to as block spacing]” (p. 326). 3. Title page. The title and abstract pages of a copy manuscript are organized for anonymous review and typesetting. Elements that require separate pages are usefully combined on a single page: the title, author, abstract, and author note. The running head becomes the page header, as it does in published articles. APA Lite is a guide to crafting final manuscripts. It incorporates these recommendations from the 2001 edition of the APA Publication Manual (5th ed.). For the rest, APA Lite follows the current sixth edition (2009). You cannot copyright a style. By law (17 U.S.C. 102(b)) "the original and creative word sequences in [a text] are protected by copyright, but a writing style itself is in the public domain, no matter how original it is" (The Copyright Handbook, 3rd. ed., by Stephen Fishman, 1998, Berkeley, CA: Nolo Press). You cannot copyright a research (or any) style, nor can you copyright a language, even a programming language. If for example, you could copyright all the works in the style of William Shakespeare, you would own...
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