Ap Literature -Delicious Cuisine

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Delicious cuisine is definitely something the whole world is interested in, and a person’s taste for food can often reveal his lifestyle, personality, and even status. In Geoffrey Chaucer’s Prologue to The Canterbury Tales, we can learn  about the Franklin’s hospitality and hedonistic lifestyle through Chaucer’s portrait of the Franklin’s refined love of exquisite cuisine. Through his lofty diction, use of poetic devices, and  imagery, Chaucer revealed the Franklin’s love for pure food, hospitality, purity, and honorable actions. Chaucer cleverly unveiled the Franklin's personality, social status, and lifestyle through his vivid description of  the Franklin and use of  metaphor and allusion. Living in the Medieval time period, during which delicious cuisine was precious and scarce due to the lack of resources, a person’s appearance could tell us  a lot about his or her lifestyle and social status without speaking a word. Chaucer must have similar ideas about a person’s appearance, for he has dedicated many lines to describe the Franklin's appearance, which can lead us to fathom his eating habit, wealth and even his personality. “As white as,” Chaucer writes, “any daisy shone his beard;”(312) White is also associated with purity and nobility, and the fact that his beard is as white and shiny as a beautiful flower suggests that the Franklin loves pure things, specifically pure and prime food. Moreover, Franklin’s “sanguine complexion” suggests that is very healthy, unlike the pale faces of poor, malnourished people. His reddish face is also a result of his hedonistic lifestyle, for he loves to drink wine everyday.  Chaucer goes on to emphasize the Franklin‘ hedonistic lifestyle: “Always to pleasure would his custom run, for he was Epicurus’ own son”(315). Epicurus is a Greek philosopher who taught that happiness is the goal of life; Chaucer’s use of allusion makes it clear that the Franklin has inherited his love of overindulgence from his “father”, who thinks that...
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