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  • Topic: Optical illusion, Brain, Mind
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  • Published : April 25, 2013
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Ashley Henderson
2/19/12
4B
Written Report
SCIENCE FAIR: Optical Illusions
Can age affect the way people view optical illusions?

Table on Contents

● Introduction
● Abstract
● Hypothesis
● Variables
● Materials
● procedures
● Data
● results
● conclusions
● research paper
·Awknowledgements

Introduction
I. INTRODUCTION- Optical art is a style of art that was created in the 1960's, it creates a series of movements, vibrations, and popping effects to the human eye. When viewing optical art, the human eye transfers the image of this mystical art to the mind allowing the brain to analyze the movements of the image. Could age effect the way people see these optical illusions? Could a mind with more experience be able to overcome the trickery that was drawn on to the optical image? personally, I believe that people of younger age (children/toddlers) can view optical illusions more vividly because their imagination is more active than teens or adults. The purpose of my experiment is to discover whether or not maturity/older age has an effect on the way the mind views certain images, in order to do so, i will perform experiments to successfully answer this question and i will provide logical information in doing so.

Abstract
The title of my project is called "can age affect the way people view optical illusions?" The purpose of my experiment was to find out if ones maturity level can affect the way their brains interpret an optical illusion.The procedure involved showing 3 of my family members optical illusions.The pictures were placed infront of my mother, grandmother, and younger sister. What one family member saw was recorded in my journal for data. I repeated this for the other two subjects. My results of my data resolves that my younger sister was able to notice all different movements and flashes the image created more than my mother and grandmother. My data also concludes that my grandmother (the oldest tested subject) didnt see much of the optical illusion.

Hypothesis
If a persons age is older, then the ability to view optical illusions will be less likely then someone of younger age.

Question: Does age affect the way humans view optical illusions? Independent Variable: Age
Dependent Variable: The ability to see optical illusions
Control Variable: The age of the people tested: 9 years of age-40 years of age Hypothesis: People that are younger will view optical illusions in a more vivd way, because humans use of imagination is more effective at a younger age. Materials:

·Print out of optical illusions
·Three to five people to test.
·Data tracking form.
Procedure :
·Each person will be exposed to a simple optical illusion. ·After they are exposed, I will ask them what they see. ·Then after testing the younger subjects, I record my data. ·After doing so, I will move on to the medium age group ·Repeat procedures

·Move on to the oldest age group
·Repeat procedures 1-4
Data Journal
Name: Grandmother
Age:55
Result: "Dots in the center stand out
more than anything."

Name: Mom
Age:38
Result: "The circles seem to be
moving counter clock wise
and clock wise. The dots
dont stand out ask much as
the colors"
Name: Kayla
Age:9
Result:"The snakes move when
you dont look at them, i can
see the dots, but i see the
colors more."

Results

It seems as though my younger sister was able to notice
every detail in the experiment better than my grandmother
and my mother. My grandmother noticed the dots within
the center of the optical illusion, which to my mother,
wasnt very noticable. My mom noticed something that
neither my grandmother and sister could quite see, which
was the illusion seemed as though it was moving both clock
wise and counted clock wise.

Conclusion
In conclusion, My little sister, mother, and grandmother all...
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