Antigone

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Antigone
Antigone was written by Sophocles, after the age of 50. Antigone is a play used to show Aristotle’s Definition of a Tragic Hero. His definition of a tragic hero is a man who is held in a high place of society and is brought down by the decisions he makes; because of that, his punishment may exceed the crime. In the end, he must accept the fact as to why he has fallen. The tragic hero of Antigone was Creon, who was king of Thebes. Creon is a tragic hero because he is a man of noble stature, he is a great man but not perfect, and lastly he finally understood to why he has fallen. Creon is a Man of Noble Stature, because he is a prince or king. In Scene 1, the Chorogas says, “But now at last our new king is coming…” (Line 1, pg 654). When the Chorogas calls Creon their “new king” it shows that Creon is held in a high place of society and he is also considered royal. When Creon is pronounced as King of Thebes, it means he is held in a high place of society. In the prologue the Chorogas says to Creon, “If that is your will, Creon son of Menoikis, you have the right to enforce it, we are yours…” (Line 44-46, pg 655). The Chorogas is happy with Creon ad their new king; they obey and respect him in every decisions he chooses to make. Creon has heroic qualities as well, which is why the chorus respects and honors him. In Scene 1 Creon says to the Chorus, “…Our Ship of State…has safely come to harbor at last…as long as I am king, no traitor is going to be honored with the loyal man…” (Lines 8-9 and 40-41, pg 655). When Creon says this to the chorus it shows that he cares for his fellow people, and is also his city, and he will not let anyone mess with them. Although Creon is held in a high place of society he has many flaws that make him imperfect. Creon is a Great Man but not perfect, he has flaws that will slowly bring him down from his high place in society. One of Creon’s many flaws is quickness to anger. In Scene 1 Creon says furiously,...
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