Anti Discriminatory Practice

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Unit:2

Leeanne Norman
Task 2
Anti-discriminatory practice

Contents
* An explanation of how national initiatives promote anti-discriminatory practice (P4)

* A description of how ant-discriminatory practice is promoted in health and social care (P5)

* An assessment of the influence of a recent national policy initiative promoting anti-discriminatory practice (M2)

* A discussion of the difficulties that may arise when implementing anti-discriminatory practice in health and social care settings (M3)

* An evaluation of the success of the recent initiative in promoting ant-discriminatory practice (D1)

* A justification of ways of overcoming difficulties that may arise when implementing anti-discriminatory practices in health and social care settings (D2)

Introduction

Discrimination – The unjust or prejudicial treatment of different categories of people, especially on the grounds of race, age or gender. Discrimination is unlawful in Britain, it can make service users lose self-esteem, self-confidence and leave them depressed. Their rights are taken away from them. There are two types of discrimination, overt and covert discrimination.

Overt discrimination
This is when someone is openly discriminating against an individual, an example of this is a health and social care setting paying a male nurse more money than a female nurse for the same job, directly because of their gender. In the health care sector, overt discrimination is more likely to be seen in the way a patient is treated by staff.

Covert discrimination
Covert discrimination can be best described as being hidden away. An example of this is three individuals applying for the same job as a nurse; they should all be shortlisted using the same criteria. However, if the shortlist panel decided not to call someone for an interview based on their name or area they lived in, this would be covert discrimination. There are many effects of discriminatory practice such as:

* Marginalisation
* Disempowerment
* Low self esteem and self identity
* Restricted opportunities
* Negative behaviour
* Loss of rights
Anti discriminatory practice
Discrimination is illegal in the UK, and in the health and social care sector anti-discriminatory practice must be promoted to ensure discrimination does not take place. Anti discriminatory practice is about empowering individuals, and remaining true to the underpinning principles and values of care practice at all time. In the health and social care setting staff can empower its staff by encouraging them to promote individuals rights, choices and well being at all times. Promoting independence helps individuals to maintain a sense of self-esteem and confidence. If anti-discriminatory practice is not promoted, then discrimination could occur.

National initiatives

An example of national initiatives is legislation. Legislation is a law or group of laws that have been put into place to ensure the safety of individuals in the health and social care sector. Staffs working in the health and social care sector are trained and their skills updated so they can keep up with these new ideas and procedures.

Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) 2005
an example of legislation is the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) 2005. This act specifically applies to the public sector, to promote equality of opportunity for people with disabilities and to eliminate discrimination (this includes people with the HIV virus). The act also states that public bodies must promote disability equality and must produce action plans on how they intend to fulfil their duties, and review their progress annually. Universities and colleges must make reasonable changes to the premises to make them more user friendly for Britain’s students with disabilities. This act ensures that any practices, policies or procedures do not discriminate against people with disabilities, and ensures that all services...
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