Anthropology Cultural Anthropology

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Anthropology
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the social science. For other uses, see Anthropology (disambiguation). Anthropology|
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Disciplines|
* Archaeological  * Biological  * Cultural * Linguistic  * Social| Social &-cultural subfields|
* Applied  * Art  * Cognitive  * Cyber * Development  * Ecological  * Economic * Political Economy  * Feminist  * Historical * Kinship  * Legal  * Media  * Medical  * Musical * Political  * Psychological  * Public * Religious  * Transpersonal  * Urban  * Visual| Archaeological and

biological subfields|
* Anthrozoological  * Biocultural * Evolutionary  * Feminist  * Forensic * Maritime  * Nutritional * Palaeoanthropological| Research framework|
* Ethnography  * Ethnology * Participant observation  * Holism * Reflexivity  * Cultural relativism| Key theories|
* Actor-network theory  * Alliance theory * Cultural materialism  * Culture theory * Feminism  * Functionalism  * Interpretive * Practice theory  * Structuralism * Post-structuralism  * Systems theory| Key concepts|

* Culture  * Society  * Prehistory * Ethnocentrism  * Evolution  * Marriage * Family  * Kinship and descent  * Gender * Race  * Ethnicity  * Development * Colonialism  * Postcolonialism  * Value| Related articles|

* Outline  * HistoryLists * Bibliography  * Journals * Years in anthropologyCategories * Organizations * Anthropologists by nationality| *  Anthropology portal|
* v  * t  * e|
Anthropology (pron.: /ænθrɵˈpɒlədʒi/) is the "science of humanity." [1] It has origins in the humanities, the natural sciences, and the social sciences.[2] The term "anthropology" is from theGreek anthrōpos (ἄνθρωπος), "man", understood to mean humankind or humanity, and -logia (-λογία), "discourse" or "study." Since the work of Franz Boas and Bronisław Malinowski in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, anthropology has been distinguished from other social sciences by its emphasis on in-depth examination of context, cross-cultural comparisons, and the importance it places on participant-observation, or long-term, experiential immersion in the area of research. Cultural anthropology in particular has emphasized cultural relativity, holism and the use of findings to frame cultural critiques.[3] This has been particularly prominent in the United States, from Boas's arguments against 19th-century racial ideology, through Margaret Mead's advocacy for gender equality and sexual liberation, to current criticisms of post-colonial oppression and promotion of multiculturalism.Ethnography is one of its primary methods as well as the text that is generated from anthropological fieldwork.[4][5][6] In the United States, the discipline is traditionally divided into four sub-fields: cultural anthropology, archaeology, linguistic anthropology, and biological anthropology. In Europe, the discipline originated as ethnology and was originally defined as the study of social organization in non-state societies. It was later renamed social anthropology. It is now generally referred to as socio-cultural anthropology in most of Europe, the commonwealth, and in the parts of the world that were influenced by the European tradition.[7] Contents  [hide]  * 1 Disciplines * 1.1 Sociocultural anthropology * 1.2 Biological anthropology * 1.3 Archaeological anthropology * 1.4 Linguistic anthropology * 2 Key topics by field: Socio-cultural anthropology * 2.1 Applied anthropology * 2.2 Anthropology of art * 2.3 Cognitive anthropology * 2.4 Cyber anthropology * 2.5 Anthropology of development * 2.6 Ecological anthropology * 2.7 Economic anthropology * 2.8 Historical anthropology * 2.9 Anthropology of gender &...
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