Ant 101 Research Paper

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Research Paper
ANT101: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (GSF1014E
Shaun Sullivan
April 28, 2010

Research Paper
The Canadian and American Health Care Systems

Not all Health Care Systems are the same. Some are free for their country and most are very expensive. Having compared the Health Care Systems in Canada and the United States, Canada has the best Health Care system. It is a government funded Health Care system. No matter who you are or where you live in Canada, superior quality health care is guaranteed. Basically, if you want medical attention, a doctor or some other health care professional is only a phone call away. One doesn't have to be an elite member of society or have millions of dollars to have quick access to a hospital. To begin with, I believe Canada has one of the best health care systems in the world. “In Canada today, all forms of health promotion and prevention and health maintenance is free. Whether it is a simple visit to the doctor for the common cold, giving birth or having a complex open heart surgery, it is free (Lumsden).” Not like other nations such as where I live in the United States. Canadians don't have to worry about high insurance premiums based on their level of wellness and health. They also don’t have to worry about expensive hospital visits and stays and they don’t have to ignore a sickness because they can’t afford to go to the hospital. Health care is free in Canada and that's the way it should be all over the world. All people should have the right to good, quality, public funded healthcare in their own country, not just Canada. No matter where someone lives, where they work or their status in society, nobody should be denied this basic right to a better healthier and longer life.

All nations around the world should look up to Canadians health care system. There are other reasons why I believe Canada has a good health care system and that is because their hospitals, doctors or nurses are all quite accessible. “No matter where you live in Canada, whether it is in downtown Toronto or Northern Labrador, you can generally walk in to any hospital or clinic if you are sick (Lumsden).” What's more, if you are sick and live in a smaller area of Canada where medical services and supplies are limited, chances are that person will be referred to larger towns or cities. If they require more immediate medical attention, an ambulance and trained medical professional can be at that person’s house in a matter of seconds to bring them to the nearest hospital. If at that moment their condition is more than this hospital is equipped for, they will most likely be airlifted to a major city where specialized doctors and nurses are ready to perform life saving measures for them.

In a 2007 review of all studies comparing health care outcomes in Canada and the U.S., a Canadian peer-reviewed medical journal, found that "health outcomes may be superior in patients cared for in Canada versus the United States, but differences are not consistent (2000)." The research that I had found also stated that the life expectancy is longer in Canada, and its infant mortality rate is lower than that of the United States, but there is debate about the underlying causes of these differences. The World Health Organization's ratings of health care system performance among 191 member nations, published in 2000, ranked Canada 30th and the U.S. 37th, and the overall health of Canadians 35th to the American 72nd. With that information that I gathered gave me reason to believe that having free health care will most likely give you a healthier and longer life span compared to the U.S.’s private insured health care system.

The health care system in Canada is largely government-funded, with most services provided by private enterprises. Waiting times for major non-emergency surgery have been longer in Canada, and Canada has been slightly slower to adopt expensive technology and medicines. Consequently,...
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