Anorexia Nervosa 5

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 21
  • Published : October 17, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
Anorexia Nervosa

Anorexia nervosa, the starving disease, has gained national attention in the last ten years due to its increasing victims each year. Many people keep their disease to themselves until it’s too serious to treat which may lead to death. Lots of people suffer from eating disorders and of that, 90 percent are believed to be women. Recent researchers suggest that anorexia can be caused by a mix of biological, psychological and social behaviors such as metabolism and coping skills. However, several envious teens become anorexic because they want to be as skinny as the celebrities they look up to. Treatment of anorexia is costly due to the fact that both mental and physical problems are involved. Males are often denied treatment and are denied being diagnosed because it is far less common.

Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa, have a variety of conditions that focus on a person’s lack of ability to deal reasonably with food. Research believes the problem is not with the food itself but the attitude of the person and is generally viewed as psychological in nature, driven by an obsession of as-yet-undetermined origin that goes beyond the scope of drive as we know it. ("Anorexia and other," 1985) Individuals with anorexia can become so obsessed with thinness they may starve themselves to death. Anorexics typically see themselves as fat even though they are dangerously skinny, and usually only eat enough food to keep them alive. ("Anorexia and other," 1985) Anorexia typically appears in early adolescence among girls who are high achievers academically but suffer from low self-esteem. Scientists have found that many girls have been unable to accept menstruation as a natural part of their development and may be uncomfortable with the changes in their appearance, particularly the enlargement of breasts and hips, regarding them as signs of early obesity ("Anorexia and other," 1985)

According to the article in CQ Researcher...
tracking img