Annotated Bibliography

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Carley Moore
Amy Smith
English 1102- N
2 April 2013
Annotated Bibliography
O’Donnell, Lolita. “Trauma spectrum Disorders: Emerging Perspectives on the Impact on
Military and Veteran Families.” Journal of Loss and Trauma 16.3 (2011); 284-
290. Psychology and Behavioral Science Collection. Web. 21 Mar. 2013.
O’Donnell is a member of the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health. She addressed this article after she attended the Second Annual Trauma Spectrum Disorders Conference. Her intended audience is the families who suffer from war related distress and psychologists. This article can easily be compared to “Prenatal Representations of Family in Parents and Coparental Interactions as Predictors of Triadic Interactions during Infancy,” because it discusses the relativeness between separation of parents and children and family togetherness and happiness. The article discusses the affect that war has on military and veteran families during deployment, homecoming, and reintegration. This is relevant to my topic because it discusses the relationships of family members and their interactions between each other. As my research topic is based off of all the outside resources that can positively or negatively affect families, this article gives an example of how an outside factor can shape the strength of a family.

Houston, Brian. “Family Communication across the Military Deployment Experience: Child andSpouse Report of Communication Frequency and Quality and Associated Emotions,Behaviors, and Reactions.” Journal of Loss and Trauma 18.2 (2013); 103-119.

Psychology and Behavioral Science Collection. Web. 2 Apr. 2013. Brian belongs in the Department of Communication at the University of Missouri. His intended audience is psychologists, service member, and their families. This article is almost directly related to “Trauma spectrum Disorders: Emerging Perspectives on the Impact on Military and Veteran Families,” because it’s dealing with the same groups of people. Both articles are dissecting the stresses and depressions deployed families may enter during, before, or after war deployment. Brian’s article discusses the development of children who grow up in a military family and the mixed emotions that flow within that family. Child development with a deployed parent was related to more child emotional reactions and behavioral problems versus a child with two present parents. This source is relevant for my research because it helps connect the affect military has on family bonds even more so. It also provides even more proof of outside influences taking away the togetherness of families.

Pfefferbaum, Betty. “Children of National Guard Troops Deployed in the Global War on
Terrorism.” Journal of Loss and Trauma 16.4 (2011); 291-305. Psychology and
Behavioral Science Collection. Web. 1 Apr. 2013.
Betty works at the University of Oklahoma’s Health Science Center. His audience is military families and psychologists. This article directly relates to “Family Communication across the Military Deployment Experience: Child and Spouse Report of Communication Frequency and Quality and Associated Emotions,Behaviors, and Reactions” and “Trauma spectrum Disorders: Emerging Perspectives on the Impact on

Military and Veteran Families.” All three of these articles are dealing with the saddened military families who have to find a way to cope with the loss of their loved ones during deployment. They all address the emotions, depressions, and stress that the family members go through before, during, and after deployment. Children of deployed servers experienced emotional and behavioral issues during the deployment of their fathers relative to pre- and post-deployment. According to Betty the children’s worry and uncertainty, may give rise to ambiguous loss associated with deployment in military families. This article is relevant to my topic because it helps define a sharp line...
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