Animal Testing

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Animal Testing

Animal Testing Cruelty

Everyday people are seen with their most loved and prized possession. That possession is not always a car, expensive jewelry, or even someone they are with. Instead it is their animal, their partner in crime, or as many refers to them, their best friend. In 2006, nearly half of pet owners, or 49.7%, considered their pets to be family members. Furthermore, there are more than 72 million pet dogs in the U.S. and nearly 82 million pet cats. (AVMA). Despite our affection for pets and animals, we still use them for animal testing. This paper examines the use of animals for research and development in various products and medicine we use every day. Although animals are not sentient, they are still living, feeling creatures and should therefore not be subjected to preventable suffering. Most people do not often think of what goes on with the millions of animals in the world and what happens to them behind closed doors. They never stop to think what happens to the many animals that aren’t lucky enough to find caring and loving homes. When people like you and I use luxurious amenities such as shampoo, lotion, or even medicines such as vaccines and pain killers; we do not stop to think of what research went into these items. Instead, corporations continue to push for more and more improvements in already proven products without a care that the lives of innocent animals are being thrown away to come out with an “ALL NEW!” product. Animals are suffering and being put in lab environments so they can be tested on to make the rich corporations even more money. Animals have no way of voicing how they are feeling, and the pure misery and agony they are put in is intolerable to some. Unfortunately, the companies look at this as a necessity, business as usual. They believe the benefit they get from releasing a new hairspray is worth the millions of animals that are tested on in a single year. A vast number of these animals being tested on die from the lethal materials put into their bodies, lack of nutrition, or they just give up on life and die from pure depression. Alternative testing needs to be used, and the notion that animal testing is not animal abuse is hypocritical and ridiculous. New testing alternatives, or even placing strict restrictions on what can be done to the animals needs to be put in place. In order to properly address this issue, a brief history of animal testing is necessary to provide all readers with the main concepts and origin of animal testing. It started centuries ago in Europe and the United States, primarily for two reasons; curiosity and convenience. Even in the Stone Age when people cut into an animal they were probably curious about the various blood vessels and organs that were visible inside the creatures body (Fano,11). Live humans were not generally available or willing to be operated on to satisfy another person’s curiosity. Animals were the alternative. Early scientists cut into living and dead animals, as well as human corpses, to learn about the internal construction and function of bodily systems (Fano, 13). In the early beginning of animal testing, animals were experimented with mainly to understand the bodily systems, but now animal testing has further extended the basics of looking at bodies, to injecting lethal chemicals to see their reactions which slowly kill the animals. Animal experimentation became the primary method of learning about anatomy, physiology, and disease processes because the state-supported Roman Catholic Church in early Greece and Rome forbade the dissection of human corpses. This let physicians and other curious scientists cut into animals without worry because animals were believed to have no souls carried within their bodies. This also made many believe that the absence of a soul meant that the animals felt no pain. Even if a scientist came across a perfect opportunity to research human corpses, they were unable to due to...
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