Animal Suffering - Introduction

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Introduction
Everyday people purchase meat from super markets without thinking about what the animals went through while they were still alive. This paper will provide an argument on why factory farming is cruel to animals. Factory animals suffer so much for nothing in return. Animals are put through intolerable conditions and are treated poorly. At the end of the paper the reader will understand why it is important to gain knowledge of how animals are treated in factory farms. Argument

Farming since the 1920’s has changed dramatically. Vitamin A & D was discovered in the 1920’s and farmers realized that animals no longer needed to be raised as free range. The popular belief of farm animals is pictured as animals grazing in open pastures. It would be great if this were true. However, most farms are now factory farms. In the United States alone there are more than 2.1 million farms. Over half of those farms produce livestock. In the past eating meat was popular only among the rich people. In the 1950’s only 0.1 billion animals were slaughtered, in 2010 9.1 billion animals were slaughtered. As of June 2011 4.1 billion animals have been slaughtered so far. (States, 2011) Due to the high demand for meat factory farming became popular. Animals raised in factory farms are treated and raised poorly.

Today, there are 280 million egg laying hens in the United States. They are forced to live in battery cages. These cages are small cages made out of wire lined and stacked up. These egg laying hens are stored in huge ware houses where they are unable to get fresh air or any sunlight. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) requires that each hen gets up to four inches of feeding space. However, not every farmer follows regulations. Hens are crammed up into cages where they are unable to spread their wings or move. These egg laying hens suffer psychologically and physically.

Another animal that suffers in the factory farming industry are pigs. For the pigs the suffering starts with the breeding sows. The females are treated like endless breeding machines until they are no longer able to bear any more. They live an endless cycle of breeding and giving birth. After giving birth they are impregnated again. Each sow has more than 20 piglets a year. The sows are put in small crates where they are unable to turn or lie down on the ground. Due to these living conditions they suffer from sores, obesity, and crippling knees. When a sow is unable to breed they are sent to the slaughterhouse. The baby piglets are subject to mutilation and are not offered anesthesia or pain relievers. In order to reduce tail biting the piglets tails are snipped off. To identify them their ears are snipped with notches. Only 10% of the piglets survive are 2-3 weeks of these cruel living conditions. At 6 months of age when they reach 250 lbs they are sent to the slaughter house.

The air in the factories are intolerable even to the workers who only coming in daily for just a few hours. The factories are polluted with dander, dust, and noxious gas from their waste. The workers are at high risk for bronchitis, sinusitis, and asthma. The workers can leave at the end of the day but the animals have no escape. About half of the piglets that are born don’t make it to the slaughterhouse due to the poor housing conditions. Because of poor air quality and cramped living conditions it makes diseases such as the swine influenza.

In June 2008 there was a great flooding in the Midwest where most pig factory farms are located. The flood happened due to heavy rains. Most farmers have escape plans for their animals in case of emergencies and evicted their farm animals. Some however didn’t. Farmers opened the doors to the warehouses and left the pigs to fend for themselves. At the end of the storm rescuers found pigs mangled in the pens or stuck in ventilation vents. It is hard to believe what kind of suffering the pigs went through. Before the pigs...
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