Animal Farm by George Orwell: a Novel Developing the Idea of Communism

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  • Topic: World War II, George Orwell, Joseph Stalin
  • Pages : 2 (525 words )
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  • Published : December 5, 2012
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1) The idea of development of Communism is meant to be good. a. Weak or strong, clever or simple, we are all brothers. No animal must ever kill any other animal, all animals are equal. b. Nobody stole, nobody grumble over his rations, the quarreling and biting and jealousy which had been normal features of life in the old days had almost disappeared. c. All animals are equal.

2) Formation of Communism
d. Major’s speed builds to the rhetorical climax of “all animals are comrades,” which apothegm is immediately by the dogs’ pursuit of some rats that they see. A vote is taken and the rats become “comrades,” followed by the animals banding together against their common enemy, man, under the aegis of the motto, “all animals are equal” e. The light of what is to happen, it is easy to see that the pigs managerial role is further foreshadowing of the ultimate perversion of the seventh commandment, but this does not mean that the revolution is therefore wrong, or that Orwell think that all revolution are inevitable self-corrupting. 3) Why Animal Farm is written

f. In “why I Write” he says, “I think from the very start my literary ambition were mixed up with the feeling of being in isolated and undervalued” and later, “I wanted to write enormous naturalistic novels with unhappy ending full of detailed descriptions and arresting similes, and also full of purple passage in which words were used party for the sake of their sound.” g. His work becomes at this time prompted more by external event that by his own direction: “when I sit down to write a book, I do not say to myself. ‘I am going produce a work of art; I write because I want to draw attention, and my initial concern is to get a hearing.” h. In the subsequent years, Animal Farm has been interpreted from feminist, Marxist, political, and psychological perspectives, and it is perceived as an important and relevant book in the post-world war II literary canon....
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