Animal Farm by George Orwell: an Allegorical Novel Reflecting the Russian Revolution

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Animal Farm by George Orwell is an allegorical novel, reflecting the events of Russia in 1917-1943.

Orwell uses characters and specific details to describe the events that led to the Russian Revolution. To

give a deep understanding of the history and the book, he has animals represent the counterparts to the

of events and the people who influenced the revolution. Animal Farm shows the connections of events from

the Communist Manifesto of 1848 to the events of the Tehran Conference of 1943 by having animals

symbolize the settings. Old major as Karl Marx, Napoleon as Joseph Stalin, and Mr. Jones as Tsar Nicholas

II are just the three of many that are mentioned in the book.

The first event mentioned in the book is the connection of Old Majors dream and Karl Marx's Communist

Manifesto. Both bring the idea of Communism into life by influencing people with their theories and ideas. During

Old Majors speech he stated, "Weak or strong, clever or simple, we are all brothers"(31).This shows that all

animals shall be treated equal and should join together, even if they do not get along. In the Communist Manifesto,

Marx speaks of communism throughout the book, while Old Major brings up the basic of his ideas. "Man is the

only creature that consumes without producing" (29). He explains to the animals that man have been taking advantage

of them for years and it is finally time to end that and take control. Marx said the exact same thing in the Communist

Manifesto, stating that the workers never saw the product of their labor because the capitalist always claimed the

profit. He suggests that the workers should overthrow the capitalist and claim what is theirs, then all the workers would

live in peace with each other.
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