Animal Farm's Book Review

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Animal Farm
I don’t know if this is truly a review for this book, a major reason may be that most of the people pass out of high school having read a book and written a book report too sometimes; thanks to our education system, somehow I skipped that complete episode. At this age, if I write a book review, it wouldn’t be fair; on the internet there is no shortage of different reviews. One more additional review is not going to make any difference; the difference lies in how and what lessons can be taken away from this classic. Animal Farm is a satirical allegory – the different characters portray different characters of Russian revolution; given the era in which this book was written, it is obvious. I would talk about two characters who I believe are the two kinds of people we see in our society. First would be the Boxer, one of the farm’s cart horses, the strongest and hardest worker on the farm. Initially, his motto was “I will work harder”, and later when the going got tough he shrugged every bit of doubt out of his mind and made his motto to be “Napoleon is always right”. On the other hand, Benjamin was the ill-tempered, cynical donkey of the farm. His kind was completely detached from whatever happens in the world, because they have accepted that things would always be the same and would always be bad. He worked as usual, never did anything extra, and never expected anything extra. Of course Benjamin was right, things did go from bad to worse. Benjamin is the voice of the author, as well as the contemporary strategists who saw the consequences of the Russian Revolution. But it is Boxer that influenced me the most, as it is Boxer who at least tried to believe that his actions and contributions would make a difference to society. I do not say it is the best way to approach a problem or issue, but it is definitely better than doing nothing and simply accepting destiny. As every author adds irony and a little spice in the story, Orwell made Benjamin and Boxer...
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