Anglican History

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Anglican History

Anglicans trace their roots back to the early Church, and their specifically Anglican identity to the post-Reformation expansion of the Church of England and other Episcopal or Anglican Churches. There were two main stages in the development and spread of the Communion. Beginning with the seventeenth century, in the eighteenth century when missionaries worked to establish Anglican churches in Asia, Africa and Latin America.  The Anglican Communion has more than 70 million adherents in 38 Provinces spreading across 161 countries. Although the churches are autonomous, they are also uniquely unified through their history, their theology, their worship and their relationship to the ancient See of Canterbury. Anglicans uphold the Catholic and Apostolic faith. They follow the teachings of Jesus Christ, the Churches are committed to the proclamation of the good news of the Gospel to the whole creation. This is based on the revelation contained in Holy Scripture and the Catholic creed. By baptism in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, a person is made one with Christ and received into the fellowship of the Church. Central to worship for Anglicans is the celebration of the Holy Eucharist (Holy Communion) the Lord's Supper or the Mass. offering of prayer and praise, the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Other important rites, commonly called sacraments, include confirmation, holy orders, reconciliation, marriage and anointing of the sick. The mission is to carry forward the work that Jesus Christ began in all aspects of the life of people in society. The Anglican Church broke away from the Catholic Church when Henry VIII wanted to divorce his wife, but was not granted an annulment from the Church. The church was formed purely for political reasons, not theological reasons. 

Study of Aim
The study of aim is to compare the Anglican and the Roman Catholic Church 1. The Anglican faith and the Catholic faith is similar because of the many sacraments, the sacrament they have in common is Holy Baptism and Holy Communion Confirmation, Ordination, Holy Matrimony,  and Anointing of the Sick . The study of aim is to show how they believe in a higher power (God) The Anglican church broke away from the Catholic Church when Henry VIII wanted to divorce his wife, but was not granted an annulment from the Church. As the mission of the Anglican faith is The mission is to carry forward the work that Jesus Christ began in all aspects of the life of people in society, and it also mean it’s similar to the Catholic faith.

The study of aim is to

Statement of Aim

The name "Anglican" means "of England", but the Anglican church exists worldwide. It began in the sixth century in England, when Pope Gregory the Great sent St. Augustine to Britain to bring a more disciplined Apostolic succession to the Celtic Christians. The Anglican Church evolved as part of the Roman church, but the Celtic influence was folded back into the Roman portion of the church in many ways, perhaps most notably by Charlemagne's tutor Aidan. The Anglican church was spread worldwide first by English colonization and then by English-speaking missionaries. The Anglican church, although it has apostolic succession, is separate from the Roman church. The history of Christianity has produced numerous notable separations. In 1054 came the first major split from Roman administration of the church, when the Eastern Orthodox church and the Roman split apart. The conflict of authority in England between church and state certainly dates back to the arrival of Augustine, and has simmered for many centuries. The murder of Thomas a Becket was one of the more famous episodes of this conflict. The Magna Carta, signed by King John in 1215, contains 63 points; the very first point is a declaration that the English church is independent of its government.. Discontent with Roman administration of the church.

The beginning of the sixteenth...
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