Angela's Ashes Essay 5

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  • Topic: Frank McCourt, Malachy McCourt, Angela's Ashes
  • Pages : 3 (950 words )
  • Download(s) : 24
  • Published : October 21, 2010
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Angela's Ashes is an illuminating story written from a child's perspective. The language of the book is simple, and the author recalls the memories of his youth with ease. The story mixes humor with the reality of poverty and depression. With McCourt's dialogue, he effortlessly speaks with an “innocent eye”… Dialogue, innocent eye, dialect, use of quotations, comic relief. Intro here! The use of dialogue throughout Angela's Ashes is well-chosen. When McCourt is in his younger years he uses a language that a five year old would use and so on throughout his life. His vocabulary is not that of an adult because he is a child in the story. It is amazing how McCourt can recollect exactly what happened when he was a child. "...Malachy is stirring beside me. Frankie, I want a drink of water...I fill a cup of water for Malachy and me and my mother wails, Water for you and your brother. Oh, indeed." (35). He seems to know every detail and show it with such clarity through his use of words and dialect.

Its effectiveness is primarily due to McCourt's evolving 'innocent-eye' narrative technique. He allows the reader to experience his own life in a changeable form. Through this unique story telling technique, the reader is able to watch Frank grow and evolve. Between the ages of four, eleven and fourteen changes in his writing can be easily identified. It is evident that the written text, McCourt's thoughts, and the resultant relationship with the reader evolve and become more complex during this part of his life. When describing his experiences at the age of four, he uses simple dialogue and a 'tell it like it is' approach: "We're on the seesaw. Up, down, updown. Malachy goes up. I get off. Malachy goes down. Seesaw hits ground" (19). At this point, he demonstrated a basic, staccato-like sentence structure. McCourt presents information as if heard and interpreted by a child. On page 38 Mrs. Leibowitz, a kind neighbour who lives in the same building as the McCourt family,...
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