Ancient Life of the Great Lakes Basin

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Ancient Life of the Great Lakes Basin: Precambrian to Pleistocene

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Table of Contents
I. Introduction3
II. History of the Great Lakes Basin3
III. Precambrian Period3
IV. Ordovician Period4
V. Silurian Period4
VI. Devonian Period4
VII. Pennsylvanian Period4
VIII. Mississippian Period4
IX. Lost Interval5

Ancient Life of the Great Lakes Basin: Precambrian to Pleistocene

The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the ancient life of the Great Lakes Basin from the Precambrian era through the Ice Age. The Great Lakes region is a freshwater lake, which has a study of ancient life. The area has showed organisms that have lived about 3 billion years ago. The Great Lakes lost interval when the region was uplifted it wiped away the fossil record. J. Alan Holman states that, “The Great Lakes region is now a microcosm for the study of the decolonization of deglaciated habitats by plants and animals, the great extinction of the mammalian mega fauna at the end of the Ice Age, and the appearance of humankind in the New World.” The Great Lakes Basin came about by glacial erosion during the Ice Age. The individual area was also formed by the erosion and was filled by glacial melt water. Before the glacial erosion to the Ice Age, the Great Lakes were a plateau of ancient bedrock that had been eroding away for millions of years after an uplift of basin containing ancient seas. The Great Lakes Basin consists of ancient consolidated material. The bedrock is mainly covered in the Great Lakes Basin. The geological time scale and the geological map of the Great Lakes region can help understand the history of life in the Great Lakes region. The Great Lakes region has fossils located in different units of the geological time scale. The Precambrian Era depicts all of the time between the origin of the earth and the Cambrian period, when life first became abundant. Precambrian rocks haven’t...
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