Anchor Terminology

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  • Topic: Anchor, Ship, Compass
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ANCHOR TERMINOLOGY:
1)ANCHOR AWEIGH:THE ANCHOR IS SAID TO BE AWEIGH THEMOMENT IT IS BROKEN OUT OF THE GROUND AND CLEAR OF THESEA BED.

2)ANCHOR A-COCKBILL:WHEN THE ANCHOR IS HANGINGVERTICALLY FROM THE HAWSEPIPE, WITH THE FLUKES TURNEDINTO THE SHIPS SIDE. IN THIS POSITION IT WILL NOT STOWCORRECTLY IN THE HAWSE PIPE.

3)ANCHOR BUOY:A BUOY USED TO INDICATE THE POSITION OF THESHIPS ANCHOR WHEN ON THE BOTTOM.

4)ANCHOR COMING HOME:WHEN THE ANCHOR IS BEING DRAWNTOWARDS THE SHIP IN THE OPERATION OF HEAVING AWAY, BYMEANS OF THE WINDLASS OR THE CABLE HOLDER/CAPSTAN, THEANCHOR IS SAID TO BE COMING HOME. INSTEAD OF THE SHIP BEINGDRAWN TOWARDS THE ANCHOR, THE REVERSE IS HAPPENING.

5)ANCHOR DRAGGING:THE ANCHOR IS SAID TO BE DRAGGING WHENIT IS NOT HELD IN THE SEA BED. IT IS SAID TO BITE WELL WHEN ITHAS A GOOD HOLD IN THE GROUND. THE VESSEL IS DRAGGINGANCHOR IF SHE MNOVES HER POSITION WHILE DRAGGING THEANCHOR OVER THE SEA BED.

6)ANCHOR WARP:THE NAME IS GIVEN TO A HAWSER OR ROPE WHENIT IS ATTACHED TO THE ANCHOR AND USED AS A TEMPORARYCABLE.

7)BROUGHT UP:A VESSEL IS SAID TO BE BROUGHT UP WHEN HER WAY HAS STOPPED AND SHE IS RIDING TO HER ANCHOR, WITH HER ANCHOR HOLDING.THE TERM ‘COME TO’ AND ‘GOT HER CABLE’ARESOMETIMES SAID TO BE THE SAME THING. THE OFFICER IN CHARGEOF THE ANCHOR PARTY WILL KNOW WHEN THE VESSEL IS BROUGHTUP, BY THE CABLE RISING UP FROM THE SURFACE TOWARDS THEHAWSE PIPE WHEN THE BRAKE IS HOLDING IT. THE VESSEL SHOULDTHEN MOVE TOWARDS THE ANCHOR, CAUSING THE CABLE TO DROPBACK AND MAKE A CATENARY.

8)CABLE CLENCH:A STRONG STEEL FORGED FITTING IN THE CABLELOCKER FOR SECURING THE BITTER END OF THE CABLE.

OTHER TERMINOLOGIES:
Abaft the beam: Said of the bearing of an object which bears between the beam and the stern (further back than the ship's middle). Abaft: A relative term used to describe the location of one object in relation to another, in which the object described is farther aft than the other. Thus, the mainmast is abaft the foremast (in back of). Abandon ship: Get away from the ship, as in an emergency.

Abeam: The bearing of an object 90 degrees from ahead (in a line with the middle of the ship). Able bodied seaman: The next grade above the beginning grade of ordinary seaman in the deck crew. Aboard: In the vessel (on the ship).

Aboveboard: Above decks; without concealment of deceit (out in the open). Abreast: Abeam of (alongside of).
Accommodation ladder: The portable steps from the gangway down to the waterline. Admiral: Comes from the Arabic "Emir" or "Amir" which means "First commander" and "Al-bahr which means "the sea". Emir-al-barh evolved into Admiral. Adrift: Loose from the moorings (not tied or secured).

Afloat: Floating.
Aft: At, near, or toward the stern (back end).
Aground: Resting on the bottom.
Ahoy: A call used in hailing a vessel or boat (hey!).
Air tank: A metal air-tight tank built into a boat to insure flotation even when the boat is swamped. Alee: To the leeward side (away from the wind).
Alive: Alert (pep it up!).
All hands: The entire crew.
All standing: To bring to a sudden stop.
Aloft: Above the upper deck (above).
Alongside: Side to side.
Amidships: In or towards the middle of a ship in regard to length or breadth (center of). Anchor: A device or iron so shaped to grip the bottom and holds a vessel at anchor by the anchor chain. Anchor bar: Wooden bar with an iron shod, wedge: shaped end, used in prying the anchor or working the anchor or working the anchor chain. Also used to engage or disengage the wild-cat. Anchor chain: Heavy, linked chain secured to an anchor for mooring or anchoring. Anchor lights: The riding lights required to be carried by vessels at anchor. Anchor watch: The detail on deck at night, when at anchor, to safeguard the vessel (not necessarily at the anchor; a general watch). Anchor's aweigh: Said of the anchor when just clear of the bottom (leaving or moving). Anchorage: A place suitable for anchoring.

Ashore: On the shore (on land)....
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