Anaylsis of to Juan at the Winter Solstice

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Anaylsis of To Juan at the Winter Solstice
By King Derp
Since the beginning of recorded history man has told his own story. Humans want to know the experiences of others and that they want others to know of their own story. In “To Juan at the Winter Solstice” by Robert Graves conveys that the human experience is the ultimate story. A central theme in this poem deals with the human experience of life. How all things relate to each other no matter how indifferent that they seem. “There is one story and one story only / That will prove worth your telling”. The first two lines deal with human life. You have only one life to live and what you do with the time you are given is completely up to you. It also deals with the fact that everyone wants to be remembered so you need to make sure that your life is one worth talking about. “Such common stories as they stray into.” Everyone starts the same, we are all born as a baby and as we grow up we go down different roads living different lives in hopes that when we are gone that we will be remembered for something we did. “Or the Zodiac and how slow it turns” Time continues on at a slow and steady pace that we can either take advantage of it or we can let it be as “strange beasts that beset you”. “So each new victim treads unfalteringly/ The never altered circuit of his fate / Bringing twelve peers as witness/ Both to his starry rise and starry fall.” These lines take on a sense that we are all going to be judged at the end of our lives. Saying how each of us live our lives without knowing the future, but we are in a supposed predetermined fate that has already decided whether we will “rise” as in go to heaven, or “fall” to go to hell. “Or of the undying snake from chaos hatched,” the undying snake is an allusion to Satan who deceived Eve into committing the sin against God thus creating the first forms of chaos in the world. “Battles three days and nights,” alludes to the three days after Jesus was crucified when the...
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