Analyze the Successes and Failures of Soviet Policies Towards Germany and the Eastern European Satellite States During the Regimes of Khrushchev and Brezhnev

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Analyze the successes and failures of Soviet policies towards Germany and the eastern European satellite states during the regimes of Khrushchev and Brezhnev

In order to analyze the successes and failures of Soviet policies towards Germany and the eastern European satellite states during the regimes of Khrushchev and Brezhnev one must choose eastern European satellites that were affected by the Soviet policies most and had a direct relationship with Moscow during the reigns of these two leaders: Khrushchev (1953 – 1964) and Brezhnev (1964 – 1982). In this case, I decided to choose Poland, Hungary and Czechoslovakia as eastern communist states as there were some important government changes with which the Soviets had to deal. One should also acknowledge that the policies towards Germany will be also discussed and analyzed for their successes and failures.Khrushchev emerged to power in 1953 and pursued the policy of de-Stalinization which was basically criticism of Stalin’s policies and blaming him for being personally responsible for the purges. He established the policy of “the thaw” which was – relative tension and restrictions. However, pursuing the policy of de-Stalinization turned out to be more of a failure rather than a success in terms of the Soviets relations with its satellites. Soviet satellites and many observers in the West saw this as a movement towards tolerance and freedom. However Michael Lynch argues: “De-Stalinization was never intended to be a genuine liberalizing of Soviet society.” Support for this quote can be evident when referring to Nagy, a Hungarian patriot, planning to withdraw Hungary from the Warsaw Pact. The political situation in Hungary soon became confused when began his campaign for de-Stalinization. In the mean-time Rakosi and Nagy were both involved with the government. Rakosi was a prime minister and Nagy was a president both seated with the help of the Soviets. This happened due to failed policy of the Soviet...
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