Analyze the Responses of Franklin Roosevelt's Administration to the Problems of the Great Depression...

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The prosperity of the roaring 1920s left Americans unprepared for the economic depression they would be facing in the 1930s. On October 29th, 1929 (Black Tuesday), the stock market crashed, and President Hoover was expected to lift the nation back onto its feet. However, like many previous presidents, Hoover maintained the government’s laissez-faire attitude in the economy. Soon after, the election of FDR and his many “alphabet soup” programs in his first 100 days addressed the nation’s call for help. Although Roosevelt’s administration was not very effective in curtailing the Great Depression, it left a lasting legacy in the role of the federal government by creating lasting programs, satisfying many of the needs of the citizens, and increasing the federal government’s power. Many government programs created from the New Deal are still intact today. One such program is Social Security (doc. E), the “jewel” of the New Deal. It addressed elderly citizens’ lack of care, and provided money for those over 65. Social security continues to be one of the biggest money-eaters of the federal budget. Other programs still intact today include the TVA (jobs in the Tennessee Valley), SEC (committee that regulates the stock market), and the FDIC (bank insurance). The Roosevelt Administration also attempted to address the needs of citizens, both socially and economically. With great efforts from FDR’s wife, Eleanor, women and Blacks gained some recognition and had improved rights. Some of the New Deal programs included Blacks (doc. I), and Roosevelt even appointed African Americans to his Brain Trust—a group of close advisors (doc. H). The Great Depression also brought into light the questionable social expectations of women. During the depression, women were rarely seen waiting in bread lines and sleeping in the streets even thought they faced the same hardship (doc. A). the pride many of these women held influenced the need of these women to hide their suffering in order to...
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