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Analysis of the poem 'My Country' by Oscar Krahnvohl

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Analysis of the poem 'My Country' by Oscar Krahnvohl

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  • Feb. 23, 2007
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Stanza One:

Starts with 'I love a sunburnt country', which is the exact wording of the second stanza in the original poem by Dorothea Mackellar. This particular stanza (from the original) is the most oem by Oscar Krahnvohl like environmental issues, humanity issues, cultural issues and politicwell-known, and by Oscar starting with this particular line, he exposes the brilliance of the previous poem, but the next few lines start as a parody from the influence of the previous poem.

In this stanza there are very similar lines towards the original for e.g. 'A land of open drains' to the original 'A land of sweeping plains'. Oscar talks about the urban sprawl across the country, with references to taking over land that was once a sign of nature to busy towns, buildings being built and the spread of investors coming from overseas. Oscar still uses the structure of the original with the lines rhyming in the places on the same lines; which make this stanza and poem very enjoyable to read.

Stanza Two:

This stanza is particularly about the nature and wildlife which is obvious to the reader as it starts of with, 'a nature-loving country...' but the message is then changed after the line 'Beneath whose golden wattles', which are an Australian identity in the bush, he also suggests that beneath the wondrous beauty of the wattles there are creeks filled with newspapers and broken bottles. Oscar also uses a very blunt but concerned tone in these two lines, he uses words to show his disgust at how much the environment has been littered in.

In the last three lines of this stanza it tells us of the hot weather, 'Still whose cities chafe', and how most of the public water (beaches, lakes etc.) are relatively safe to bathe in which says that it is hardly safe to swim in this water as they hold habitats to dangerous creatures. In this stanza we see that Oscar is quite cynical in the way where he contradicts himself with a 'nature-loving country' to a country filled...