Page 1 of 3

Analysis of the poem 'Lost Heritage', written by Heather Buck

Continues for 2 more pages »
Read full document

Analysis of the poem 'Lost Heritage', written by Heather Buck

Page 1 of 3
The poem Lost Heritage, written by Heather Buck is concerned with the forgotten past, our lost heritage. In this free verse poem the speaker preaches that in todays generation we have lost our touch with the past. Todays children are blind to the importance and significance of our past, our heritage because it is failed to be taught and provided. The speakers realization that children of the modern day world are deprived the knowledge of the intricate and colorful past is explored in this poem. The speakers sullen tone, dark imagery and the constant theme of lost Buck is able to emphasize the connection that has been lost between the present day and our heritage, and how he this disturbs him.

The first stanza brings in the in the main theme, what the speaker is preaching about, the importance and significance of our heritage. Bucks appreciation of the past is set-up through the extended metaphor of carpets in this first stanza, which continues throughout the poem. This metaphor is established to represent our past our heritage, through this extended metaphor Buck attempts to emphasize the significance and importance of our heritage. The opening line "Coreopsis, saffron, madder, daily we tread kaleidoscopes of color, on Persian rugs we set our feet" indicates the speakers view on our past, a colorful and bright heritage. The importance of the past is also realized by the speaker, he/she believes that our heritage influences our lives significantly, The intricate patterns that shape our lives. The first stanza is mainly concerned with the beauty and importance of human heritage, however Buck already here introduces wrongdoings that we are doing beauty. This idea is casually hinted in the second stanza with the simple usage of tread. The disrespect that we have for this beautiful past, which we tread all over is continued to be developed as the poem continues. Blind to the woven threads and dyes (line 4). The word blind, referring to the metaphor of carpets,...