Analysis of "A Savage Life"

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Through the use of anecdotes in the article “A Savage Life”, Suzanne Winckler effectively points out that it is important to understand where your food comes from. Winckler helps convey to readers that while butchering animals is no fun, it is necessary for the survival of omnivores. She argues that meat-eaters are out of touch with reality; instead of recognizing that an animal must be sacrificed for their meal, most consumers mindlessly devour the food on their plates – without a thought of where their food came from. Winckler states “I am too far gone in my rational Western head to appropriate the ritual of cultures for whom the bloody business of hunting was a matter of survival” (634); in this statement she adequately appeals to logos by helping readers realize most cultures kill animals as a way to gain nourishment – nothing more. Through the use of pathos, logos, and ethos throughout the essay, Winckler appropriately directs readers’ attention to the fact that they should be thankful animals lose their lives for the well-being of humans.

Winckler begins her argument by explaining she butchers chickens every few years with some friends in order to make a small profit. She immediately describes the process: “we had decapitated, gutted, plucked, cleaned and swaddled each bird in plastic wrap for the freezer…for dinner that night we ate vegetables” (633). This declaration is powerful in that it shows Winckler does not find chicken appetizing after butchering it; she is conveying that most meat-eaters would be turned off by the process of slaughtering their own chickens. She remarks “butchering chickens is no fun, which is one reason I do it” (633). Some may see this phrase as a post hoc logical fallacy because Winckler seems to contradict herself; most people cannot fathom why someone would do an activity because it is no fun. Well, through close reading, it is understandable that Winckler dreads the process of killing animals, but she believes so deeply in...
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