Analysis of a Decision Making Model

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Every day in life, we all make decisions. Some decisions may be minute in their level of importance, and some may be so critical as to influence the rest of your life. As we make these decisions, most of us do not take the time to look at all of the options available to us. In some cases, this can be dangerous. In my particular case, I needed to expand the reach of my business from the general-public, to include some of the local corporations and small businesses. To do this I needed to further my education to include areas such as networking, UNIX systems, LINUX, and a few programming basics. This left me with a major decision making process ahead of me. Where do I go to further my education in Information Technology? I could have done a Google search and chose the first thing that popped up, but this could have left me in an awkward position. What if the school is not accredited? Will the school transfer and apply my existing credits? What are the course options? What classes are offered that better suit my needs? These are all very important questions that needed answering. Therefore, I had to look over all of the options for obtaining my degree in IT. I had to weigh the available courses offered from each school to what I need to expand my business. The only way to do this was carefully lay out my options. Then model my decision to come up with the best solution towards my business and personal goals. Following is a carefully laid out plan to accomplish this task. I used a similar model in my decision making process, and without it, I would not be here right now. Analysis of a Decision Making Model

Making a Decision
With any Business, there will be problems that arise or decisions to be made. Solving these usually involve a process known as modeling. Modeling breaks a decision down into a series of steps designed to make the decision making process both efficient and sound. The alternative, not thinking a decision through, could lead to costing...
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