Analysis of Working Capital Management.

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CHAPTER - I

INTRODUCTION

Introduction Working Capital Management

Working capital refers to that part of the firm’s capital which is required for financing short- term or current assets such as cash, marketable securities, debtors & inventories. Funds, thus, invested in current assts keep revolving fast and are being constantly converted in to cash and this cash flows out again in exchange for other current assets. Hence, it is also known as revolving or circulating capital or short term capital. Working capital management is concerned with the problems arise in attempting to manage the current assets, the current liabilities and the inter relationship that exist between them.

The term current assets refers to those assets which in ordinary course of business can be, or, will be, turned in to cash within one year without undergoing a diminution in value and without disrupting the operation of the firm. The major current assets are cash, marketable securities, account receivable and inventory. Current liabilities are those liabilities which intended at there inception to be paid in ordinary course of business, within a year, out of the current assets or earnings of the concern. The basic current liabilities are account payable, bill payable, bank over-draft, and outstanding expenses. The goal of working capital management is to manage the firm’s current assets and current liabilities in such way that the satisfactory level of working capital is mentioned.

Definition:-
According to Guttmann & Dougall-

“Excess of current assets over current liabilities”.

According to Park & Gladson-

“The excess of current assets of a business (i.e. cash, accounts receivables, inventories) over current items owned to employees and others (such as salaries & wages payable, accounts payable, taxes owned to Government)”. [pic][pic][pic]Capital required for a business can be classified under two main categories via, 1)     Fixed Capital

2)     Working Capital
        Every business needs funds for two purposes for its establishment and to carry out its day- to-day operations. Long terms funds are required to create production facilities through purchase of fixed assets such as plant and machinery, land, building, furniture, etc. Investments in these assets represent that part of firm’s capital which is blocked on permanent or fixed basis and is called fixed capital. Funds are also needed for short-term purposes for the purchase of raw material, payment of wages and other day – to- day expenses etc.

Title: Working Capital Model

Figure: 1.1

Source: www.workingcapitalmanagement.com

CONCEPT OF WORKING CAPITAL
There are two concepts of working capital:
1.     Gross working capital
2.     Net working capital
The gross working capital is the capital invested in the total current assets of the enterprises current assets are those assets which can convert in to cash within a short period normally one accounting year. CONSTITUENTS OF CURRENT ASSETS

1)     Cash in hand and cash at bank
2)     Bills receivables
3)     Sundry debtors
4)     Short term loans and advances
5)     Inventories of stock as:
a.      Raw material
b.     Work in process
c.     Stores and spares
d.     Finished goods
6. Temporary investment of surplus funds.
7. Prepaid expenses
8. Accrued incomes.
9. Marketable securities.
 In a narrow sense, the term working capital refers to the net working. Net working capital is the excess of current assets over current liability, or, say: NET WORKING CAPITAL = CURRENT ASSETS – CURRENT LIABILITIES. Net working capital can be positive or negative. When the current assets exceeds the current liabilities and when the current liabilities are more than the current assets....
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