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Analysis of Torture

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  • July 2013
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Analysis of Torture Abstract In analyzing whether torturing and enemy combatant or high–value targets are moral efforts in an American free society, one could look at the war on terrorism as an basis of it being moral or not. The act of torturing a person to get information that will help the good of the country is a thin line and could be seen as a moral act in some people eyes or not. Torturing a person is inflicting injury on a person against his will and is sometimes overlooked if the reason for the torture is justified. Although torture is an inhumane act sometimes it can be acceptable in order to attain information that will help a country of people compared to a single or group of people that are trying to cause harm against a host of people for the good of mankind. The ethical theory of utilitarianism justifies these issues as stated in the book “Ethics in Criminal Justice, In Search of the Truth” which reveals that “ethical actions as those that tend to maximize happiness and minimize pain, for the greater of happiness, the greater the moral value of the act”(Souryal, Sam, 2007). Therefore the utilitarianism theory justifies that act of torture if it is for the greater of happiness, and it makes the act of torture moral because it is for the good of mankind. Torture is defined by Cornell University Law School as “the act of a person who commits, or conspires or attempts to commit, an act specifically intended to inflict severe physical or mental pain or suffering upon another person within his custody or physical control for the purpose of obtaining information or a confession, punishment, intimidation, coercion, or any reason based discrimination of any kind” (Cornell University Law School, 2013). Torture goes on at both sides of the fence during war time and acts of terroristic times in our society. Military personnel...