Analysis of the Sagrada Familia Barcelona

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Sagrada Familia
4:05! And we were explicitly told to be on time; hopefully the class will not leave without me. I arrive to Main Campus and don’t see a classmate in sight. Do you in fact not have a field trip today? Ahhh…let me run to COACB to try not to miss too much class. On my way there, I run into my Professor Aridiana. That’s interesting…its 4:11 and my professor is not in class. Clearly there was some miscommunication in Spanish Art. By the time we were able to coordinate with out entire class where to meet and where we were going, it was 4:30 and we only had an hour to walk to and see the Sagrada Familia. Fortunately, I had already seen the Gaudi’s historic Roman Catholic Church twice as it is arguably Barcelona’s most notable tourist destination. I do always enjoy our class field trips though, gives us an opportunity to spend time with our classmates outside COACB. I must say however, that as the cover page for all of Barcelona’s guidebooks, it is kind of disappointing and anti-climactic. The outside of the building is phenomenal with its intricate and ornate architecture. The 18 spindle shaped towers grace the Barcelona skyline and stand out for miles. Upon entering the actual cathedral, it resembles more of a construction site than the last great sanctuary to Christendom. I understand that this was Gaudi’s last and most important architectural masterpiece, and the reason worked stopped on the church was because of the Spanish Civil War of 1936. Simply put, I think that the excessive amount of scaffolding and workmen don’t do the impressive church the justice it deserves. I look forward to returning to Barcelona in 2050 and seeing the finished product.
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