Analysis of the Poem "Daffodils" by William Wordsworth

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Analysis of the Poem "Daffodils" by William Wordsworth

By | December 2011
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Ефимовой В., гр.02174
“Daffodils” analysis
The poem “Daffodils” is also known by the title “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud”, a lyrical poem written by William Wordsworth in 1804. It was published in 1815 in 'Collected Poems' with four stanzas. William Wordsworth is a well-known romantic poet who believed in conveying simple and creative expressions through his poems. In English literature, Wordsworth was one of the pioneers in the development of the Romantic Movement, or romanticism, a movement that championed imagination and emotions as more powerful than reason and systematic thinking. Nature was a guiding force to the romantic poet. Romanticism began in the mid-1700's as a rebellion against the principles of classicism. It promoted subjectivity, emotional effusiveness, and freedom of expression. “Daffodils” is a lyric poem focusing on the poet's response to the beauty of nature. It portrays a moment on April 15, 1802, when Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy were walking near a lake at Grasmere, Cumbria County, England, and came upon  a shore lined with daffodils. He is now looking back on how much of an impression it has had on him.  The poem consists of four stanzas, each of them being a sestet. The meter is iambic tetrameter, it is very even and regular. Each stanza has a cross rhyme in the first 4 lines and then ends with a rhyming couplet. The rhyme comes at the end of lines, it is exact and masculine. We know that the speaker is a poet because he tells us so in line 15. As we can judge by the first 2 lines, he is a typical romantic character, a lonely sensitive observer. He has a rich imagination, as he creates the image of dancing people around him out of the field with flowers. He speaks in the third person, but we know that he speaks about himself. The tone of the poem is dynamic, it changes throughout the poem. We can observe it considering the plot structure. In the exposition the poet wanders around and with the help of simile we can feel how...