Analysis of the Haunted House

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  • Topic: Charles Dickens, Fiction, Literature
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Introduction to Prose Analysis
Formalist Approach Analysis to
Haunted House Short Story
Charles Dickens


Written by :

Dhian Nurma WC0307002

Annissa Maulina C.N.RC0308001

Sabila RosdianaC0308006

Yunita Tyas PC0308008

Casandra AleksiaC0308023

Dorina Nur KC0308082

English Department Faculty of Letters and Fine Arts

Sebelas Maret Surakarta University


There are many approaches to reading and interpreting literature for analysis. One of the more controversial approaches to literary analysis is the formalist approach. The formalist approach to literary analysis emphasizes the objective and literal interpretation of the tone, theme, and style of a literary text. The formalist literary analysis is often referred to as a scientific approach to literature because of the unembellished and literal analysis method that is applied to the written text. Formalist critics do not discuss any elements outside of the text itself such as politics or history. The formalist critic analyzes the form not the content. The form of the story can show us the literariness of this story.

I. The Theme of the Story

The title of this story which is “The Haunted House” shows us from the first time that its theme must be mystery. It’s explicitly stated not only by its title, but also the narrator said it from the very beginning, “Under none of the accredited ghostly circumstances, and environed by none of the conventional ghostly surroundings, did I first make acquaintance with the house which is the subject of this Christmas piece.”

We personally think that the mystery part of this story reinforces people notions about mystical stuffs that it always relates to psychology. Like what the narrator had in this story, he felt that he’s being haunted by a ghost of his house. But, in the end, we could find that actually those were just his hallucinations of his childhood experiences.

II. The Background...
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