Analysis of Sustainable Development

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Question A

Sustainability development analysis

The development goals of UN are expressed in terms of human and environmental well-being, couched in terms of major issue areas: example; health, food, water, energy and the environment.

The World Bank, for example, uses the discourse of ‘financial, physical, human, social and natural capital’ in its conceptualization of sustainable development. The Brundtland Commission report on ‘Our Common Future’ (WCED, 1987) focuses on institutional imperatives in addressing sustainable development issues, including political, economic, social and administrative systems. The Brundtland Report explicitly addresses the matter of production and technological systems, but without anchoring the discussion in the realities of the patchy, embryonic state of global environment and technology cooperation. It is significant that embedding sustainability development into mainstream policies for international cooperation in environment and technology has been underdeveloped, particularly at the global level. However, it is just as significant that where major partnerships in environment and technology exist between developed and developing countries, sustainability development issues are often in the forefront, often in the context of technical aid to the developing countries (Stein, 2002a). What this approach fails to achieve, however, is systematic knowledge transfer between and amongst countries that are not directly involved in such cooperative ventures. It also presupposes a model of innovation as emerging from the developed world to be subsequently adapted by the developing world, whereas the reality of innovation is far more complex and evenly distributed than typically acknowledged by the ‘donor’ countries.

Defining Sustainability
Defining sustainability is very difficult as the common use of the word sustainable suggests an ability to maintain some activity in the face of stress and this seems to be also the most technically applicable meaning. In simple terms, sustainable development refers to maintaining development over time. However, at the international level, there are several factors and conditions that need to be considered including peace, debt reduction, terms of trade, non-declining foreign aid, economic policy, techniques for measuring sustainable development, the trade-offs between conflicting environmental goals. Tolba (1987) argues that sustainable development has become an article of faith, often used but little explained.

Sustainable development can be defined as development that meets the needs of the present, by ensuring environmental stewardship, economic growth and social justice function in a milieu of good governance, without comprising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. It contains within it two key concepts:

• the concept of 'needs', in particular the essential needs of the world's poor, to which overriding priority should be given; and • the idea of limitations imposed by the state of technology and social organization on the environment's ability to meet present and future needs." Sustainable Development Pillars

|[pic] |
|Governance |

Fig 1.0
Sustainable development consists of four pillars. These pillars are economic, social, environment and governance. 1. Environmental Sustainability
Environmental sustainability is the process of making sure current processes of interaction with the environment are pursued with the idea of keeping the environment as pristine as naturally possible. Below is an environment state of sustainability table.

Table 1.0
|Consumption of renewable resources |State of environment |Sustainability | |More than nature's ability to replenish |Environmental degradation |Not sustainable...
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