Analysis of Rupert Brooks Poem

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I am analyzing the poem "The Soldier" by Rupert Brooke. This poem isabout a man who loves his country dearly. The country is England. He believes that if he should die in a far away battle field that people should remember of him only that he was English. Brookes says in his forth line, "In that rich earth a richer dust concealed." This means that if he is to die in a land other than England that the soil would be made better because there would now be a piece of England within it. The plot of this poem reinforces it's meaning because it deals with death and love. These are two powerful things that evoke feeling in people.It helps to create an image in the poem of a man who is very brave and would do anything for his country. The character in the poem reinforces the meaning because he truly believes in his country. He describes England in his ninth line by saying, "And think, this heart, all evil shed away." These are the words of a man who truly believes that his land is the greatest of good. During the course of the poem the author deals with two issues: death and love. Death because the speaker is a soldier, most of them die, and possibly he will die in the war; and love because the speaker shows us the love that he has for his native land, England. It seems that he was a true patriot.

I think that this poem “The soldier” could be divided into two parts, it is by means of its stanzas, but I mean: the first stanza refers to the physical part of people, in this case the soldier; and the second stanza would be the psychological part. In the physical part, the speaker uses words that refer to things that you can touch, more or less, or verbs as for example “bore, shaped, made”. In the second part, the psychological, the speaker refers to feelings or things that you can not touch, using words as for example “mind, thoughts, sounds, dreams”. The meaning in the poem is straightforward; while you are reading you can understand what Rupert Brooke is talking about...
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