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Analysis of on the Road by Langston Hughes

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Analysis of on the Road by Langston Hughes

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  • March 2008
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Beautiful symbolism and imagery are found in the literature work On the Road by Langston Hughes. Langston Hughes offers a gift in this work which is to open the heart and life will provide unlimited abundance. During this literary analysis Langston Hughes uses nature to demonstrate his main character's unwillingness to participate in life. Another point that Hughes demonstrates is the use of anger and survival and how it can be used as a powerful force in breaking down racial barriers. One more impact Langston Hughes uses is Jesus Christ as a metaphor. Hughes uses this as how people experience life and how traditional church values contradict each other when it comes to the acceptance of human beings. Therefore after reading On the Road, the views of nature, racial barriers, and values are explained to the readers and power behind them.

To begin, Langston Hughes uses nature to demonstrate a distinct relationship amongst blacks and whites. The writing shows the relationship between the different races amongst the men and women. Langston Hughes use of snow and night express a point simple enough, but through the use of these metaphors, he enables the story to be less invasive and more appealing. Langston Hughes' main character, Sargeant, is left doubting the goodness of life. Hughes wrote, "Sargeant didn't see the snow, not even under the bright lights of the main street, falling white and flaky against the night. He was too hungry, too sleepy, too tired". Langston Hughes stated this because the character was one minded at the time and did not take the time to notice the beauty and lesson that nature showed to him. For almost two hundred years white people have suppressed the black population. Hughes' use of snow and night give us perfect example. Sargeant was tired of fighting, tired of surviving, tired of hoping, and most of all tired of the white people who've suppressed and tormented his life. Hughes writes that if combined, the beauty of both night and...